Julian Lennon dating

See all Julian Lennon's marriages, divorces, hookups, break ups, affairs, and dating relationships plus celebrity photos, latest Julian Lennon news, gossip, and biography. Julian Lennon is currently single. He has been in one celebrity relationship.He has never been married. By entering your details you will be added to the Julian Lennon official mailing list. You will receive regular emails form Julian Lennon and The White Feather Foundation. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link in the footer of the emails. Speculation is rampant that 57-year-old Julian Lennon is expecting a baby after long-time partner was spotted with a prominent stomach bulge on Saturday evening, during romantic dinner date. Is the John Lennon's son about to be a dad to a little boy or girl? Julian Lennon has had encounters with Valeria Golino (1994), Brooke Shields (1992), Charlotte Lewis (1988), Fiona (1988), Katie Wagner (1987) and Debbie Boyland (1982 - 1983).. About. Julian Lennon is a 57 year old British Musician. Born John Charles Julian Lennon on 8th April, 1963 in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, UK, he is famous for John Lennon's son. Julian Lennon was born as John Charles Julian Lennon on 8th April 1963 in Liverpool, the United Kingdom. His father was the famous John Lennon of Beatles. His mother was John’s first wife, Cynthia. Julian was named after his paternal grandmother, Julia Lennon. Julian’s godfather was Brian Epstein, the manager of the Beatles. More about the Julian Lennon and Olivia D'abo dating / relationship. More about the Julian Lennon and Sally Hodson dating / relationship. More about the Julian Lennon and Katie Lotto dating / relationship. More about the Julian Lennon and Debbie Boyland dating / relationship. More about the Julian Lennon and Lucy Bayliss dating / relationship. Julian Lennon. Julian Lennon is an English photographer and musician whose real names are John Charles Julian Lennon. He is the son of John Lennon, the legendary co-founder of Beatles and was the inspiration behind three Beatle’s songs, namely Good Night, Hey Jude, and Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds. Singer Julian Lennon, 56, visited his dermatologist just days ago, who noticed a lump on his head which he had had all his life 'looked and felt a little different' and she urged him to have a biopsy. JULIAN LENNON has reportedly called off his engagement to his girlfriend.According to May Pang, who once dated Julian's Beatle icon dad John Lennon, the singer has separated from his partner Lucy ... Julian Lennon doesn't want to repeat the ''mistakes'' his father John Lennon did. The 49-year-old singer was the result of the late Beatles legend's first marriage to Cynthia Powell, and he admits ...

Photographers

2020.07.30 16:36 Soul_Man2004 Photographers

An editing base for David Bowie's photographers.
The original was removed by bots so I'm using my profile instead. Don't think I'll be able to put it anywhere else.
Anyone coming into my profile to use this, feel free. It's unorganized as hell.
find for: Low Symphony 92,
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2020.07.13 13:53 Lyberg31 Top 10 Beatles Songs

10: A Day In The Life - paving the way for all future music to come, this masterpiece on sgt. Peppers lonely hearts club band inspired thousands of musicians everywhere, such as Arne Alligator, Drake and MC Obama.
9: Don't stop me now - Still standing the test of time, this George song about him commiting several war crimes across the southern hemisphere started a riot against the beatles, where many fans started burning beatles records. Rumours were that this song originally had a sitar as lead until the band changed this.
8: Sandstorm - Featuring probably ringos best drum solo ever, Sandstorm is about a man conflicted about his relationship with his wife. It really gave us a look into Johns lovelife and his characteristics. This is Sean's favourite song, Julians least.
7: Öppna landskap - Often considered Sweden's inofficial national anthem, this paul song was great for so many reasons. While many people believe this was a cry for help from paul others thought, quote "it's just more of that f**king granny music." Classic paul.
6: Lucid Dreams - The quiet Beatle really got to show his guitar and singing skills in this hit. This song was the inspiration for Sting's "Shape of my Heart". While many wanted to sue Sting for this obvious plagiarism, the boys were friends with him and thus didn't feel the need to sue him.
5: Scatman's World - Rigno never often wrote songs but when he did, you knew they were smash hits. This song from the album Dark side of the Moon really showed of Ringos vocal range in magnificent ways
4: When It Bedtime - The Yellow submarine soundtrack is considered quite controversial because of the fact that half the album is just compositions from George Martin. While we here agree for the most part, one of the songs stand out more for us than the rest. This short sound snippet would both become famous for featuring in a vine aswell as being one of the main inspirations for 'Revolution 9'.
3: Wild Honey Pie - applause
2: Moonlight - Oh, John. Marrying Yoko took a toll on him. He really pours his heart out in this song. Although many people still discuss the meaning of the lyrics I think everyone can agree that " Nigga, why you trippin'? Get your mood right, uh. Shawty look good in the moonlight" is to this date one of the best lyrics in any beatles song.
Honorable Mentions:
All-Star
Gay Jews
McLennon Medley (Yes Daddy)
1: Halo 3 Theme - And At Number one, without a doubt, the best song by the band. Just like the song 'Flying' This was composed by all four beatles, resulting in the most amazing sound collage that could compete with Mozart, Bach, Crazy Frog, Vivaldi and Beethoven. This song came to be when Microsoft approached the Beatles after hearing 'All-Star'. Microsoft was so impressed by the song that they immidiatly wanted the Beatles to compose their upcoming Halo game. True Story.
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2020.05.01 21:20 UpDoor Anita Cochrane?

For those unaware:
The only sour note to the day came from the uncle of Anita Cochrane, who plastered Liverpool with 30,000 leaflets recounting his niece's affair with Paul and its outcome. Anita, an 18-year-old Beatles fan, discovered that she was pregnant after partying with Paul at Stuart Sutcliffe's flat in Gambier Terrace. Unable to contact him by registered letters and telegrams, she eventually retained a lawyer who threatened legal action... Brian Epstien is said to have intervened personally and offered £5000 in exchange for renouncing all claims on Paul (published figures vary depending on the source). The agreement said that Anita must never bring Paul to court or say or imply that he was the father of her child, Philip Paul Cochrane...
-- The Beatles Diary Volume 1: The Beatles Years, Barry Miles
Hey, I was reading up on her story and I was sort of shocked - if Paul had confirmed that it was his, who knows how different the Beatle story would've been? Paul might've even stayed in Liverpool to help take care of the kid. Or it might've been similar to Julian's relationship to John.
Anyway, there isn't a wealth of information on the internet about her or Philip. There was one page I found about her, but the only sources they provide were
Interviews with Anita and Philip during May 1997, various newspaper articles about Anita and her son, various Beatles and Paul Biographies including The Beatles A Diary by Barry Miles and A Twist Of Lennon by Cynthia Lennon.
I'm guessing that the 1997 interviews they refer to might be ones with the Daily Mail? I say that because Howard Sounes put this in his references for his biography of Paul (which has about a paragraph about her, saying the usual story)
Anita Cochrane’s story: author’s interviews with Tony Barrow, Peter Brown and Anita’s half-brother Ian Pillans (all quoted); Anita’s interviews with the Daily Mail (31 May-2 June 1997) and family records, including her birth certificate which reveals the inconsistency of dates. I also referred to Anita’s interview with the Daily Star (1 Feb. 1983).
But I can't find the primary source (the interviews Anita did)? Not on the Daily Mail site or when I google "Anita Cochrane Interviews" or go more specific than that. Does anybody know where to find that? Or any interview Anita apparently did? I just want to confirm if literally any of the quotes from the site I linked to were legit because she allegedly said a lot of revealing things. It's very possible it's just gossip.
In total, I had sex with him only three times. But, in the 16 months I was with him, I never went with anyone else. Sometimes he ended up with other girls. It was just something I had to accept. It hurt, but I just had to accept it. The second time I was with Paul we didn't have a date or anything. It was just a pick-up. At first, I thought it proved he loved me because he'd come back to me. But I soon realised I was being naive. By this time, The Beatles were becoming more popular. I still hoped I'd end up with him, but deep down I knew it was becoming unlikely...
Philip was conceived at the end of April, but I blocked it out until I was about four months pregnant. There was never any doubt in my mind that Paul was Philip's father. When my mum and grandmother found out I was pregnant, I thought I'd write to Paul and tell him what had happened. I was that sure the baby was his. I didn't get a reply, so my mum and I went to see Paul's father. He was really nice. He gave us a cup of tea. But then he said; 'Paul says he doesn't know you. That's all I can tell you.' I was very hurt I thought: 'Great, he doesn't know me. That just about sums up our relationship'.
tldr: Does anybody have any (real or maybe sourced?) info about the girl that claimed to be impregnated by Paul? Or any help on how to find that info?
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2020.01.31 17:49 jasedontlie Dennis DeYoung 26 East (volume 1) release date and more

From A Dennis Facebook post:
Hey kids
“26 East” my new album has left Union Station on its way to the stars. At least the album artwork has, the music comes later. There are 10 songs for the US and the world but there’s a bonus track in Japan. The extra track is me singing “Bohemian Rhapsody” in the shower, all the parts at once, take that Adam.
The video has already been banned by YouTube, and Crapchat. (Fake news)
Its actually a live recording of Babe, “domo and doitashimashite”.
The 3 trains represent me, John and Chuck Panozzo leaving Union Station on our impossible trip to the stars. A girl can dream can’t she? Well we did and guess what? Thanks to Hugh Gilmour in the U.K. for his brilliant artwork. We had a wonderful collaboration.
As mentioned before the title represents my parents house at 26 East 101st. Pl. in Roseland where the band was formed in 1962. Look closely at the trains.
The release date for the album is April 10, 2020. And like the good old days, a two sided single will be released in March. “To The Good Old Days” a duet with Julian Lennon is the A side and the B side is East of Midnight. They don’t suck. The album will be available on vinyl as well. Ahhh the smell of it.
Special thanks to my paisan Jim Peterik who without his talent and encouragement this album would never have been recorded. And to Jules who sang his ass off on “Days” making a dream come true. This is Volume 1, Volume 2 is already in the can, release date TBD.
Here’s the track list if you don’t live in Tokyo.
EAST OF MIDNIGHT
WITH ALL DUE RESPECT
A KINGDOM ABLAZE
YOU MY LOVE
RUN FOR THE ROSES
DAMN THAT DREAM
UNBROKEN
THE PROMISE OF THIS LAND
TO THE GOOD OLD DAYS
A.D. 2020
https://preview.redd.it/1mtecrdu85e41.jpg?width=960&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=05df99176ff10ca4ddaf7d0c686b5ae8a6ef4b4b
Cheers
Casey Jones
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2020.01.16 04:36 RickInQc Radio interview with DDY yesterday

I listen to it live and the radio station posted it , so ...
https://www.iheartradio.ca/chom/audio-video/dennis-deyoung-on-his-love-of-montreal-additional-show-date-working-with-julian-lennon-1.10461660?mode=Article
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2020.01.11 00:33 sizzle_nb GUITAR PLAYER INTERVIEW 2003

Electric warriors: the Strokes Albert Hammond, Jr. and Nick Valensi play it like it is
Author: Michael Molenda
Date: Dec. 1, 2003
From: Guitar Player(Vol. 37, Issue 12)
Publisher: NewBay Media LLC
Document Type: Interview
Length: 3,533 words
Content Level: (Level 4)
Full Text:
Let me show you how to write a Strokes story for the popular press: "Languishing in a humongous New York photographer's loft, Strokes drummer Fab Moretti is absolutely terrified about his choice of clothes. 'Are they cool enough,' he asks? Meanwhile, guitarists Albert Hammond, Jr. and Nick Valensi are arguing over where to eat. Even for fabulous rock stars, it's tough nabbing a table at a SoHo nightspot on a moment's notice. Bassist Nikolai Fraiture is above such worries. Rolling a piece of cold pepperoni pizza in his somewhat cruel mouth, he's idly destroying a journalist at a game of chess, while simultaneously devouring a book of Edgar Allen Poe's short stories. Slumped deliciously on a red leather settee, vocalist Julian Casablancas is nonetheless a picture of quiet, seething discontentment. 'Hey, aren't we supposed to be rehearsing?'" If the preceding isn't really your style, just muster your finest celebratory, myth-making prose, and take a shot yourself.
Okay, reality time. The Strokes are not a myth. Quite sadly, in fact, for those seduced into hilarious orgasms of quasi-journalistic platitudes, they are simply--and heroically--an extremely hard-working rock band. Friends forever, the members' work ethic is extraordinary. They rehearse incessantly, continue to feverishly hone their respective crafts, and will tear down and rearrange a song until it's either perfectly constructed or indisputably without merit. And they're so dedicated to musical honesty that they refuse to record anything they can't reproduce on a live stage.
No outsider ever truly breaks into the core, either, and woe to those who attempt to subverl what the Strokes believe to be undeniable truths. Take Room on Fire [RCA], for example. After the near hysterical critical reception of the band's debut, Is This It, in 2001, it was a given that the follow up would be one intensely anticipated album. So, of course, super-hot Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich was set to helm the sessions for the all-important second release. It didn't work.
While the Strokes liked working with Godrich--and Casablancas admitted the tracks might have been the "best stuff we've ever heard in our lives"--he apparently didn't make the members comfortable enough in the studio, and, subsequently, he couldn't conjure tracks that the band liked. So Strokes homeboy Gordon Raphael--who produced Is This It in a Lower East Side basement, and who clearly understands the group's anxieties about studio tensions--was back in charge for Room on Fire.
Stories such as this make it hard not to applaud the Strokes' belief in themselves, as well as each member's commitment to "getting it right" as defined by the band. And while Room on Fire sounds perhaps a bit too comfy and "played right," it will doubtlessly seduce countless kids to start bands, and the buckeroo enthusiasm of Hammond, Jr. and Valensi will most certainly inspire the next generation of guitarists. Given the Strokes' adoration for playing it straight and the members' distaste for digital editing and other studio wizardry--the future of basic, balls to the walls rock couldn't be in better hands.
You know, you're not exactly going to thrill the rack and big rig crowd with your basic setups [see "Stroke Me!", page 78].
Albert Hammond, Jr.: Well, I feel like once you find the right guitar and the right amp--which I did--you have more than enough tonal possibilities. I didn't really take advantage of that on the first album--I nearly always used the middle pickup. Now I'm playing with the pickup selector and tone knobs a lot more. For example, while we were rehearsing for the second record, we'd take a break for lunch, and I'd accidentally leave the guitar on a different pickup setting. When we'd come back and play the song again, the different tone might work, or it might not, but it started me thinking that I didn't have to do things the same way I did on the first album.
📷
Nick Valensi: I do toy around with stuff, and, every once in a while, I'll find something fun. But when I bring it to the rehearsal studio, it usually doesn't work out. For example, I tried bringing in some delay stuff, but it didn't sound right--it was too modern, and the Strokes' guitar sound is really natural. When Albert and I play by ourselves, I imagine what a guitar sounded like in the '50s. I haven't analyzed it too much, but the band sound really came together as soon as I started playing the Epiphone, and Albert picked up that particular Strat. His trebly tone and my midrange sound really work with the bass.
Working one's pickup selector and tone controls" seems like kind of a lost art for many modern rock players.
Valensi: To tell you the truth, I plug in, put everything on 7, and take it from there. Albert is a bit more tone obsessed, which is probably a good thing. But I've been playing this one guitar for so long that I know it, it knows me, and it never sounds bad.
However you constructed the most unique guitar sound on the album--the synth-like tone for the melody riffs in "12:51."
Valensi: Yeah, well how that came about wasn't really a fluke, but it happened in a weird way. I was playing these silly little jazz things using my neck pickup with the guitar's tone control rolled all the way down, and I accidentally stepped on the DeVille's channel-switching footpedal. The gain on that channel was on 12, and all of a sudden the--tone sounded like an analog-synth sound or a weird, heavy-metal, Joe Satriani tone [laughs]. Julian was the one who really saw the possibilities of that tone for" 12:51 ." So I played along with his vocal melody, doubled the part, and that was it. It was all a bit of an accident--I was just trying to get a nice jazz tone--but it sounded cool. The DeVilles didn't really like that tone, though. I blew up three of them.
Hammond, Jr.: We definitely think about different tones, but the main way we mix it up is by changing parts. We'll decide his guitar sounds better than mine on some things, or vice-versa, and we'll switch parts. Our approach is very open--we never do things a certain way although Nick is a better player, so if a part is really hard, he'll usually get it. Then again, if my guitar sounds better on a line, I'll work hard to master a part that was initially difficult for me.
How do you two decide who plays what?
Valensi: For the most part, the first thing we're inclined to do is usually the right thing. But if we're working through a song, and it's not really working out, we'll say, "Alright, screw it--I'll do your part and you do mine." That works sometimes, but not just because there's a difference in the way we play--it's also about our tonal differences. Albert plays a lot looser--even when he plays chords, he does it in a real melodic way--and his tone is more jangly than mine. I have more of a precise, stabbing sound that's pretty strict and sharp.
But the thing about the new record is, guitar-wise, there are so many melodies going on. It's not really straight-ahead, rhythm guitar or lead guitar. Somewhere along the line, we got better at filling up space musically. Instead of strumming the chords outright--like we did on the first album--we're now able to imply the harmony with counter melodies. Those melodies, and how they enhance Julian's singing, make for a more sophisticated sound. Stuff like that happens naturally--I don't recall the five of us sitting down and talking about a direction for the record. It's only in retrospect that we can acknowledge it. Six months ago, when we were working on the songs for the album, I wouldn't have been able to tell you what was going to happen.
Did you reference any guitar sounds--classic or otherwise--to help you dial in the tones for the new record?
Valensi: No. We only listened to Michael Jackson and lotto Lennon records for the drum sounds.
What was the typical recording process for Room on Fire?
Hammond, Jr.: Half the record was recorded live, and half was built up from a drum track. The approach usually depended on the drum strands we wanted. If there would be too much signal bleed when we tried to record a song live, we'd build up the tracks. I mean, if you're going to be isolated in separate rooms--and monitor the band over headphones--you might as well overdub your parts because you can focus more on your individual performance and your tones. The live tracks which were full band takes--are "Under Control," "I Can't Win," "You Talk Way Too Much," "What Ever Happened," and "12:51 ." But everything we recorded--no matter how it was tracked-had to sound live. It was important that every song had a vibe.
Valensi: There's a strict rule in the band that whatever we put to tape, we have to be able to do onstage ourselves--no extra musicians or pre-recorded stuff. Everything we record is worked through in the rehearsal studio, and we're limited to two guitars, bass, drums, and vocals. That's all we do--there are no overdubs or recording tricks. We're fortunate that we have a good relationship with ore producer, because he understands and respects this little rule.
Our process is collaborative, and everyone's personality comes through a little bit. Some songs, Julian brings in almost completely finished, and they take just a couple of days for us work up. Other songs take longer. "The End Has No End," for example, took almost four months to finish. We knew we had a cool intro and some other parts for that song, but as soon as we got to the chorus, everything would crumble. It took a long time to work out options and settle on the chorus that's on the record. You see, we don't like to dismiss something right away--it's those one or two good parts that keep you working on something until it sounds great. So we'll give a song a real shot, and if it doesn't make the cut for the album, we'll know we gave it every chance to succeed. Ultimately, that works to our advantage. For Room on Fire, we went into the studio knowing exactly which 11 songs we were going to record.
Hammond, Jr.: For this record, we tried to not do anything that we did on the first one. Otherwise, the whole process of recording gets boring because you've heard everything already. The songs changed a lot, so there was a natural evolution due to the new material, but we "also expanded our tonal palette and ended the songs differently. It was pretty exciting.
But isn't one of the challenges showing an evolution on your second record without flying too far afield of the style that won fans on your first release?
Hammond, Jr.: The only thing we didn't want to lose was our vibe. Our first record was a moment in time--a document of our set list. But I think this record sounds more like us. Because of all the turning we've done, we're better players, and we've become more adept at making sure our individual voice as a band gets down on tape. But, having said that, I also believe flint the charming quality I liked so much on our first record is still there on the second.
Valensi: Any band that had success on their first record is going to have some difficulty isolating themselves for their follow-up album. It's hard to put into words. However, any pressure we fell going in to record the new record was internal, and it was stuff we could talk out.
When we got off the road, we were more focused than ever. Julian writes the music and words, and it was good for him to be home in New York, where he's in his element and comfortable. Once there was new material to work through, it was very exciting for all of us. That is, perhaps, one of the best feelings--going downstairs, hopping ha a taxi, and driving to the rehearsal studio, knowing you're about to work on a new song.
Hammond, Jr.: When you're in a room with five guys who can play songs well together it's the biggest ego boost you can have.
How do you approach your solos?
Hammond, Jr.: All of my leads are worked out, and Julian helps a lot--he'll actually write some of the solos. Sometimes, we'll go for a certain thing--like on "I Can't Win" Nick was trying to get a Bob Marley, "Concrete Jungle" kind of solo--and sometimes we'll work on something without knowing where it's going to lead us. It depends on the song. But, overall, I tend to favor the Freddie King style of blues soloing. I really like his technique of using slowness, silence, fire, and then slowness again. It's all about letting things breathe, and then coming back and at tacking the notes.
Valensi: My influences are sort of scattered. I always liked the way Slash played when I was a kid--which maybe isn't the coolest influence, but it's the truth.
Have any of your individual influences helped forge the Strokes sound?
Valensi: When we were 13 years old, we were all friends because we dug the same music. At that time, it was Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Bob Marley, the Velvet Underground, Lou Reed, and David Bowie. Back then it was fun to figure songs out and talk about them, but we were never into playing covers. I wish there was more of a story line to the progression of the Strokes sound, but it all happened so organically. It's like trying to describe a tree growing.
Do you have plans for continued growth and evolution as guitarists?
Hammond, Jr.: I still take lessons with JP, but what I practice at home doesn't always reflect the Strokes. I want to grow as a guitarist, so I'll study things like '20s jazz or some blues. That stuff doesn't really tie into the Strokes, but in a weird way it does, because it opens up my attitude towards the guitar. As my reel for the instrument evolves, I'll become a better player. It's all about setting that impossible goal you can never reach, and, in the process, you keep learning, keep learning, keep learning ...
I mean, one thing I've learned about the guitar, is that as soon as you learn something new, you're back to square one again. You're never really finished with it. So, when I see young people playing guitar, I want to tell them it's an easy instrument to give up on. You'll typically learn something fast--and think, "Wow, I'm really getting it"--and then the next year and-a-half will drop off into a very slow progression.
Valensi: Right now, I never really think about being a great guitarist. I know we've got a great band, and I'm only interested in doing what's good for the group, and getting our music out to people. It's about the Strokes, and we all put our egos aside for the good of the band.
You know, a lot of bands say that, but egos have a way of creeping into things.
Valensi: When you put five really good friends in a room who have the same goal, they just find a way to make things work.
What about the pleasures of fame? You guys are way more famous now than when you released your first album, and people are expecting big things from you.
Hammond, Jr.: We don't really think about the fame tiring, because it happened in steps. I just try to think about being a really good band. You know, it's only late--when you're back home after touring--that you might look back at what has happened and go, "Cool!"
I don't think we're rock stars, although when you're onstage, you have to be confident. No one wants to go see a band that's timid--you want to see a band that's taking things to the next level. That's fun. For us, we're always intense and nervous before we step onstage--scared, actually--and that's half the energy. I mean, there are five guys up there who are naturally intense being nervous together. That's something an audience can feel, and it's what pushes us to deliver balls to the walls performances.
Valensi: I knew when I was a kid that this is what I was going to do with my life. Music is the one firing that I enjoy the most, and I thank my parents for shoving a guitar into my hands when I was a kid, and telling me that I had a knack for it. Once I got going, nothing could stop me. Making music in this band is all I care about right now.
Hammond, Jr.: You know, it's all pretty strange. It's quite strange to be on the cover of a guitar magazine. It's a compliment. I know that I'm definitely not a Clapton, and I'm sure that some of your readers will wonder why Nick and I are on the cover. We're young, and sometimes even I laugh when I tell people I'm a guitar player. I almost feel like I haven't earned the right to say that yet. But I love the instrument with all my heart, and I'm excited that the process of being a better player is neverending. Of course, I also realize that it's easy to put stuff down. But, you know, it's harder to come up with something better.
RELATED ARTICLE: Mapping the Strokes.
As the Strokes will not record anything that can't be replicated live, it's fairly easy to trace Hammond, Jr.'s and Valensi's parts--they each stake out their territory in either the right or left speaker. To help identify exactly who is blasting through one channel or the other, however, Hammond, Jr. provided GP readers with this basic, song-by-song script of what the guitarists are playing.
> What Ever Happened?
Chords: Hammond, Jr.
Lines, instrumental break after chorus: Valensi
> Reptilia
Chords: Valensi
Lines: Hammond, Jr.
> Automatic Stop
Chords: Valensi
Lines: Hammond, Jr.
📷
> 12:51
Chords: Hammond, Jr.
"Keyboard" lines: Valensi
> You Talk Way Too Much
Chords: Hammond, Jr.
Solo: Valensi
> Between Love & Hate
Chords, solo: Valensi
Lines: Hammond, Jr.
> Meet Me In the Bathroom
Chords, lines (chorus): Valensi
Chordal melody, lines: Hammond, Jr.
> Under Control
Chords, different inversions: Both
Solo: Hammond, Jr.
> The End Has No End
Chords: Both
"Crazy" bridge: Valensi
Solo: Hammond, Jr.
> The Way It Is
Chords: Valensi
Lines: Hammond, Jr.
> I Can't Win
Chords, lines: Both
📷
Solo: Valensi
RELATED ARTICLE: The Guru.
Although most articles on the Strokes mention him ever-so-briefly, JP Bowersock is far from a minimal presence. In fact, his influence on the band and its sound is so huge that he should be considered "the sixth Stroke." He not only remains Hammond, Jr.'s and Valensi's guitar teacher, he's also the band's vibe master, cheerleader, protector, sage, and, apparently, the only one who can translate the group's sonic ideas to its production team. In other words, if you're looking for some substantial clues to the development of the Strokes sound, you need to consider Bowersock's contributions in the same light as each individual members's musical influences and performance techniques.
"JP offers support for everyone," says Valensi. "He'll help me figure out little licks, ways to make some lines cooler--such as asking me to check out how a riff would sound with one or two notes hammered on--and how to EQ stuff. He provides general supervision on everything, and I definitely consider him part of the production team. It's reassuring to have someone in your corner who is a little bit older and wiser, and who knows so much about music."
"JP's knowledge of the guitar and life and music is amazing," enthuses Hammond, Jr. "In the studio, he really helps us when we're stuck. I might say that something sounds flat, for example, and he'll tell the engineer to boost the 2kHz range or whatever. Then we're like, 'Oh, wow--that's just what it needed!' He also knows that vibe is everything when you're recording, and he helps us relax. Maybe someone will think their tone sucks, or they're not playing something right, and he'll be able to talk it out and make it alright. Perhaps we're not sure if a take is 'the one,' and if he says it's great, it boosts our confidence. Basically, he's a figure that everyone in the band trusts, and, when you have someone like that in a room, it creates an atmosphere where it's your own little world, and you can survive with everything you have."
--MM
RELATED ARTICLE: Stroke Me!
> Hammond, Jr.
Guitars: Fender Stratocaster, Gibson Les Paul Jr.
Amp: Fender DeVille.
FX: MXR Micro Amp, Visual Sound Jekyll & Hyde Ultimata Overdrive.
Strings: Thomastik-Infeld George Benson Series, gauged .012-.052.
> Valensi
Guitar: Epiphone Rivera.
Amp: Fender DeVille.
FX: MXR Micro Amp, Visual Sound Jekyll & Hyde Ultimate Overdrive.
Strings: Thomastik-Infeld George Benson Series, gauged .012-.052.
Molenda, Michael
Copyright: COPYRIGHT 2003 NewBay Media LLC
http://www.guitarplayer.com
Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition)
Molenda, Michael. "Electric warriors: the Strokes Albert Hammond, Jr. and Nick Valensi play it like it is." Guitar Player, Dec. 2003, p. 70+. Gale In Context: Biography, https://link.gale.com/apps/doc/A110736789/BIC?u=lap17batonrmhs&sid=BIC&xid=838a510a. Accessed 10 Jan. 2020.
Gale Document Number: GALEA110736789
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2019.10.04 00:29 Pickup_your_nuts Today in History 04/10






















































submitted by Pickup_your_nuts to ConservativeKiwi [link] [comments]


2019.08.27 19:35 grenadia Babylist Babes born August 12-18

I have an almost 6 mo old son and before he was born, I made a registry through Babylist. Every week the website sends me an e-mail with a list of babies whose parents are registered with Babylist AND who have voluntarily shared their baby's names. I have removed birth dates to make it more anonymous and sorted it alphabetically instead of birth order. I don't think this breaks any rules, but please feel free to remove if this is the case.
I can also post these every week if anyone is interested!
Aaron
Abigail Roseblossom
Adalyn Pearl
Addison Sloane
Adeleena Adam
Adeline Ann
Alaina Blaire
Allegra Claire
Andrea Musa Jariatu
Ariya Jaliyah
Atziri Leilany
Aubrey Kay
Aubrey Ryann
Audrey Grace
Autumn Klairie
Avari Sky
Baby (???)
Bakari James
Banks Emmett
Baylor Lennon
Benjamin Bruno
Benjamin James
Bodhi Martin
Boston Reign
Braxton Brody
Cairo Lajuan
Calvin Arthur
Catalina Mae
Charlotte Mischelle
Charlottes Josephine (not sure if typo)
Christian Jamaal
Clara G
Connor Dana
Conor Quentin
Dawson Anthony
Dblessed Zechariah (????)
Declan
Demere Noah
Derrick Michael
Easton John
Elizabeth Rose
Elsie Lynn
Emma Ryanne
Estella Lorraine
Ethan Saul
Evalynn
Ezekiel Ryan
Fiona Elizabeth
Fiona Rose
Gabriel Lucas
Gianna
Gideon Alexander
Giovanni Santos
Hans Eric
Harper
Helena Kay
Henna Nicole
Holden Maddox
Imani Amadi Kelly
Iris Clara Birdsong
Isla Kate
Iva Rae
Izaiah
Jack Albert
Jackson Riot
Jaiden Elias
Jaxon Lane
Jocelyn Mae
John Luke
Johnny Christopher
Jonathan David
Jordan Chase
Joseph
Julian Xavier
Kai Douglas
Kasen Obrian
Kasey Denice
Kaylani Lynn
Kenley Lynn
Khylee Jade
Landon Carter
Leya
Lillian Marie
Lillie Alise
Logan Alexander
Loralei Wren
Louise
Luca Dante
Luna Alice Rae
Lydia Fay
Maci Lynn
Madeline
Mason Emery
Mckenna Grace
Mia
Naomi
Nicolas Christopher
Noah
Nolan Timothy
Octavia Wooten Rose
Oliver Henry
Penelope Anne And Tristyn Catarinea
Peregrin
Ralland Vincent
Reese
Rey Alexander
Salissa Rae
Salvatore Rocco
Shedrick
Siena And Annie
Sol Banri
Teagan Mae
Tobias Hilton
Trayvnay
Tripp
Valentin Jonathan
Violet Mozelle
Wesley James
Wesley Thomas
Wyatt Amycus
Wyatt
Zavian V
Zayden
My favorite boy/girl names here are Wesley Thomas and Audrey Grace, followed by Oliver Henry and Fiona Rose. I may have boring taste.
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2019.03.02 04:59 assbasco Countdown to Kickoff 2019 : Real Salt Lake

Welcome all to the 2019 Season Preview for Real Salt Lake, a small market club with a big attitude and expansive vision.
Team Name: Real Salt Lake
Nickname: Claret & Cobalt, RSL
Honors & Achievements: 2009 MLS Cup, 2010-11 CONCACAF Champions’ League finalist (first in MLS history), 2013 MLS Cup finalist, 2013 US Open Cup Finalist, 10 Rocky Mountain Cups (compared to Colorado’s 4).
Hashtag: #RSL
Location: Sandy, Utah - a suburb south of Salt Lake City.
Stadium: Rio Tinto (Capacity: 21,363) affectionately referred to as ‘The RioT.’ Has amazing sunsets.
Owner: Dell Loy Hansen
Head Coach: Mike Petke (3rd Season, 2nd full season)
Captain: Kyle Beckerman, Vice Captain: the Wall of the Wasatch, best goalkeeper in MLS history, Nick Rimando
Mascot: Leo the Lion , Lucky Duck
Subreddit: /realsaltlake
Supporters Details: The most engaged fan groups in the past have been La Barra Real, Salt City United, the RioT Brigade, Rogue Cavaliers Brigade, Royal Army, 435 Hive, Section 26, and the Idaho Boys. This year, the Front Office has declared that all Supporters Groups shall be combined into one which will be known as 'The RioT'. It remains to be seen what RSL is hoping to achieve out of this union. I’ve been to matches where everyone is chanting their own songs, and matches where everyone is chanting each other's songs, and it’s pretty easy to see which creates a better atmosphere. Hopefully this move comes off for RSL, because unity among the diverse supporters groups that are representative of Utah’s demographics would be a really beautiful achievement.
Away supporters sit in section 233 on the east side. It is mostly covered but exposes you to the setting sun during the afternoon/evening summer matches. Bring shades, hats, sunscreen, and don’t be a dick. Most RSL fans are nice and would love to have a chat about footy. It is pretty easy to have a few drinks/grab some food in downtown SLC before hopping on TRAX and catching a ride out to Rio Tinto, and just as easy to get from the stadium back to downtown. Beer in the stadium is expensive and boring.
Real Salt Lake Soccer Family: Utah Royals (Women’s Premier Soccer League), Real Monarchs (USL Championship). DeLoy Hansen has also invested in a RSL Academy High School in Northern Utah, and a state-of the art, European-level training facility called the Zion’s Bank Academy in central Utah. It is a world-class training facility for RSL’s first team, the Monarchs, the Royals, and RSL’s many youth teams. We are pretty much all looking forward to seeing how Hansen’s vision for youth football along the Wasatch Mountains benefits RSL in coming years. The team has already brought almost 20 youth prospects into the first team through their youth academy set up. I’m not familiar with any other MLS teams who have training facilities and a youth setup that is quite as robust as RSL’s.
2018 Numbers in Review:
Record: 14-13-7 (W/L/T), 49 points. 6th place, Western Conference Conference semifinalist, lost 5-3 on aggregate to Sporting Kansas City.
Goal Record: 55 Goals For, 58 Goals Allowed (-3)
Scoring Leaders: Kreilach [Croatia] 15, Rusnák [Slovakia] 11, Plata [Ecuador] & Baird [USA] 8
Assist Leaders: Savarino [Venezuela] 11, Plata [Ecuador] 10, Kreilach [Croatia] 9
It was a breakout year for new boys Damir Kreilach and Corey Baird, while Jefferson Savarino and Albert Rusnak showed quite a few glimpses of the jaw-dropping skill they are capable of. I expect any or all of Sava, Rusnak, Baird and Kreilach to be among the top goal creators and scorers in 2019.
2018 Season Recap
Throughout the 2018 season, RSL’s form see-sawed from shit to inspired and back again. We started the season feeling on top of the world after a decent off-season, and were quickly brought back to reality by a 5-1 drubbing at the hands of expansion team Los Angeles FC. Carlos Vela and Diego Rossi were devastating that day. We got our revenge, however, in the first round of the 2018 MLS Cup playoffs, when a magnificent Damir Kreilach karate kick and brace sent us into the Western Conference semi-finals and a date with nemesis Sporting Kansas City. Dubbed the Battle of the Beslers by some folks who were interested in simplifying a footy match down to its most basic participants, Real Salt Lake was unable to match the performance that had seen them conquer SKC 4-2 at Rio Tinto on the Fourth of July, and after a 1-1 draw in Utah, a 4-2 loss in Kansas City sent us crashing out of the playoffs.
Amazing results against the likes of Colorado (6-0 win on the road 8/25, 11-2 season AGG), Sporting Kansas City (4-2 @ home, 7/04), and both LA teams (6-2 win v. LA Galaxy 9/1 and 2-3 win v. LAFC 11/1) were contrasted against depressing results such as the home opener blowout against LAFC and back to back losses to Portland home and away in October that almost saw us not make the play-offs. It was a real ass-clenching end to the regular season for the Claret & Cobalt. Luckily, we found a new hero to take some of the pressure off our players and put smiles on the faces of fans both young and old.
At the end of the year, we’d made it back into the postseason, smacked the Galaxy silly at the RioT and sent the other LA team packing from the playoffs. Mike Petke looked like he had the team playing with a clear identity, Damir Kreilach was crowned King, El Jefe Savarino was consistently bamboozling defenders with his astonishing dribbling ability and work rate, and worries about losing Albert Rusnak had been put to bed, for the most part.
However, it was clear at the end of 2018 that our captain Kyle Beckerman and Vice Captain Nick Rimando may not have much time left performing at the highest level. This season, I expect the questions that seemed to grow around those 2 aging legends of Major League Soccer to be more definitively answered. Myself and most other Real Salt Lake fans are hoping that the Front Office has done enough to give an aging midfield and inexperienced defense support going into the 2019 kickoff, but only time will tell.
2019 Season preview:
During Mike Petke’s time, the team has tended to struggle for consistency early before picking up form late in the season. We narrowly failed to make the playoffs in his first half season and first full season, but this last year we clicked into form at the perfect time, with back-to-back 6 goal performances against teams we absolutely love to beat, let alone smash, Colorado and LA Galaxy. Never seen as many people at Rio Tinto as there were at that LA match, and what a performance. It was magnificent. The momentum carried us into the Western Conference playoffs where we got a little revenge against LAFC for the 5-1 mauling on the opening day of the season, knocking the new-comers out of the playoffs and setting up a semi-final against the newest team we absolutely love to beat, Sporting Kansas Shitty (Despite the banter, every SKC fan I’ve met at Rio Tinto has been wonderful, including Graham Zusi’s dad, who was courteous even in defeat after watching his son lose 4-2 on the 4th of July). The semifinal ended in defeat for RSL but there is a clear sense of optimism growing around the franchise going into 2019.
18/19 Offseason Ins and Outs:
Ins: Lots of young players brought in to work their way into the RSL first team from the team’s affiliate USL club the Real Monarchs. Expect the younger players to get game time with the Monarchs, while many of us are hoping the likes of Johnson, Everton Luiz, Toia, and Portillo are able to make a direct impact on the first team.
  • Donny Toia - 26 yrs - DEF - From Orlando City (Free, Re-entry draft)
  • Justin Portillo - 26 yrs - MID - Real Monarchs (free, homegrown)
  • Erik Holt - 22 yrs - DEF - UCLA Bruins (Free, Homegrown)
  • Luis Arriaga - 17 yrs - MID - RSL Academy (Free, Homegrown)
  • Tate Schmidt - 21 yrs - FW - Louisville Cardinals (Free, Homegrown)
  • Sam Johnson - 25 yrs - FW - Transfer from Valerenga (about $800k)
  • Kyle Coffee - 23 yrs - FW - University of Washington (Free, draft)
  • Everton Luiz - 30 yrs - MID - Loan from SPAL
  • David Ochoa - 17 yrs - GK - ZBR Academy (Free, Homegrown)
  • Julian Vazquez - 17 yrs - FW - RSL Academy (Free, Homegrown) - This kid is from my hometown, hoping he tears it up on the big stage in a few years.
Outs: Most of our outs were guys who rarely featured in the team, and when they did their performance levels were well below what was expected of them. We declined the option to extend their contracts.
  • GK - Connor Sparrow - Option declined
  • D - Shawn Berry - Option declined
  • D - David Horst - Option declined
  • D - Taylor Peay - Option declined
  • D - Demar Phillips - Option declined
  • M - Jose Hernandez - Option declined
  • M - Stephen ‘Sunny’ Sunday - Option declined
  • F - Ricky Lopez-Espin - Option declined
  • F - Luis Silva - Option declined
  • D- Danilo Acosta - Loan to Orlando City
Predicted Starting Lineup and Bench for March 2nd, 2019 in Houston
We've made a lot of additions and promoted quite a few players from our youth setup this year and I have no idea what Mike Petke is thinking. If this is the lineup, expect Plata and Savarino to push up alongside Baird, giving Rusnak and Kreilach space to work their magic. I provide this to you with the caveat that I could be WAY off. I expect a 4-2-3-1 formation.
 King Kreilach Jaoa Plata -- Albert Rusnak -- Jefferson Savarino Everton Luiz -- Kyle Beckerman(C) Aaron Herrera--Justen Glad---Nedum Onuoha--Brooks Lennon Nick Rimando 
Projected Bench: GK Andrew Putna, DEF Tony Beltran, DEF Marcelo Silva, CM Luke Mulholland, ATT Corey Baird, ATT Sam Johnson, ATT Bofo Saucedo,
Best/Worst Case Scenarios for 2019:
Best case scenario is obviously the team starting shit hot, Kyle Beckerman and Nick Rimando looking young and fresh, winning player of the year and goalkeeper of the year, respectively, and retiring having also won the treble of the US Open Cup, Supporters Shield and MLS Cup. Jefferson Savarino continues to weave his magic on the wing, topping the league in goals and assists (I genuinely think he has the skill to do this) and linking well with new boy Sam Johnson. Excellent rotation throughout the squad as Baird, Sava, Plata, Rusnak, Saucedo and Johnson set the league on fire up top and Everton Luiz shows himself to be the perfect mix of Javier Mascherano and Javier Morales (and changes his name to Liverpool Luiz). Hopefully by the end of the season, a midfielder to replace Beckerman and a keeper to replace Rimando have emerged and our defense is a set unit, playing solid, consistent, 9/10 football week in week out and avoiding injuries.
In reality, many of us are just hoping that Mike Petke has figured out what formation will get the best out of a pretty talented group of very young players. There is a lot of potential at RSL, and if the majority of the team are able to add a level of consistency to the magic they’ve brought on the field over the last few seasons, we could be incredibly difficult to beat and I would expect us to finish toward the top of the western conference.
Worst Case Scenario:
None of the above happens. The team fails to gel as Plata’s size and Beckerman and Rimando’s age let them down. The injuries that have mostly plagued fringe players in the past begin taking their toll on the first team squad. Rusnak gets a big offer from abroad and bails, Savarino and Kreilach follow. Beckerman and Rimando are consistently played because “surely they can get us out of this mess” and it never works. Their careers end with tears as the team falls apart, fickle or emotionally despondent fans stop attending games, and De Loy Hansen brings back Jeff Cassar. Fuck, that was hard to write.
Key Players:
RW - Jefferson Savarino - 22 yrs old - Venezuela, a legend in the making.
One of the most talented and exciting wingers I have ever seen in the flesh, with potential to be one of the best in the history of MLS. My favorite player in the league, right now. He can be electric and nearly unstoppable when he is in the right state of mind. The Venezuelan Luis Suarez, if Suarez were a nice young man who never bit anyone. He is tenacious, and even on days when he doesn’t see much of the ball, or his can’t find his touch, he always gives a 9/10 effort and can pop up with an astonishing wonder goal. I love this kid, I really, really do. He’s improved each year in MLS and I’m looking forward to watching him continue to blossom as an all around creative winger. He’s capable of putting in a decent tackle, or an inch perfect cross, he has a powerful and accurate finish with both feet, and bags and bags and bags of skill when it comes to beating his man.
AM - Albert Rusnak - 24 yrs old - Slovakian superstar
Rusnak is probably the star of this Real Salt Lake team. He’s an outstanding goal scorer, great passer, quick-thinker, usually has a decent touch. When he is on top of his game he is unstoppable. His link-up play with Savarino has been out of this world and I expect the pair to continue improving this season. Bringing Kreilach in last year seemed to help him get back to his best form. He also integrated very well into the Slovakian national team, providing He came on as a second half sub last season against Houston last season and his attitude and professionalism helped us get points we desperately needed in the race for the playoffs. Solid and exciting, RSL’s success in 2019 hinges on getting the best out of the Slovakian international.
ST/DM/RW/LW/AM/CM/RB/LB/CB/GK - Damir Kreilach - 29 years old - the KING
I’m pretty sure Damir could play anywhere on the pitch. We struggled with him and Beckerman as a midfield pair, but as soon as Mike Petke put Kreilach up top, it was as though the King found his throne and we began looking consistently dangerous. From that point forward Damir became one of the first names on the team sheet, leading by example and marshalling the team up the pitch. Having a player like Kreilach up top, Beckerman in the midfield, and Rimando in goal brought stability to the team across the whole pitch. We’re hoping the King doesn’t suffer from any second season scaries, and no one is sure how Petke will use him this year, but if Damir is on fire, this team will be on fire. He looks like a leader on the pitch and it’s clear the other players buy into it.
RSL Homegrown Players : Toia, Lennon, Saucedo, Baird, Herrera, Glad, Ruiz, Ochoa
Real’s homegrown talent has a crucial role to play this season. Lennon grew into the RB position over the course of last season and bringing Aaron Herrera in from the Real Monarchs added a lot of solidity on the left side of defense. We are on the verge of losing one of the greatest goalkeepers in MLS history and the midfielder our franchise was built upon, so our success this year may well be predicated on us being able to continue successfully integrating youth players into the team. Corey Baird and Sebastian Saucedo added a lot to our attack last year and we are hoping to see them add more levels to their game this year.
RSL Old Guard: Beckerman, Rimando, Beltran, Plata
These guys have seen and done it all with RSL. Baird’s emergence last season seems to have sparked something in Plata and brought the best out of him. Most fans are hoping these guys shine as bright as ever but there were definitely signs of clouds on the horizon for KB5 and Rimando, who nevertheless remains a GK for the record books. A lot of RSL’s success this term will hinge on these guys being able to stay fit and playing at a high-level, or Petke being able to utilize an astute midfield rotation without losing any quality by bringing players of the bench. Beltran featured in some of our biggest defeats last year, and at this point many would prefer Brooks Lennon and our other young fullbacks to get the majority of game time. Regarding Nick Rimando in goal, I’m not sure how Petke will react if he is not playing well. Alex Putna showed some potential last season, and new signing, 18 year old David Ochoa, is one of the most promising young American goalkeepers right now, but hopefully we will not have to rely on them.
In closing: We’ve reinforced well during the offseason and there is a lot of discussion on the internet and the streets of Utah about how Real Salt Lake is going to play this year, and where we will most likely finish. Optimistically I see us finishing in the top 5 in the West. Regardless of how the season pans out, the joy of watching Damir, the Karate King, Savarino dancing on the wing, and Brooks Lennon gaining confidence at RB and doing his thing has every fan of the Claret & Cobalt looking forward to this season with excitement and a-helluva-lot of anticipation.
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2018.10.10 12:39 ONightingale Tracing the Spores of the Sacred Mushroom to the impenetrable Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca

‘Tracing the Steps of the Ghost Dance’ is a storytelling project about the importance of the ancient relationship between people, plants and their environment. Using the Ghost Dance ritual as our case study; we follow the spores of the Desheto mushroom to the impenetrable and majestic Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca. This project being led by our Americas project director Michael Stuart Ani, who has been a student of plant wisdom for fifty years with a deep connection to the Lakota, Yamomami and Mazateca.
To read the introduction of this journey, see here.
The Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca
To trace the steps of the Ghost Dance further, we need to look at the type of geography and cultural offset it originated from. In Mexico, cloud forests account for approximately 0,6% – 1% of its territory, yet they harbour about 10% of the countries’ plant species. Cloud forests are therefore priority regions for biodiversity research and conservation efforts. However, despite them being the predominant type of vegetation in mountainous areas (speaking of 1,000 meters – 2,500 meters), human activities have reduced these forests to mere fragments.
So what makes Cloud Forests so unique? These forests have a constant cloud coverage, making them extremely humid but relatively cold with temperatures up until 23 degrees celsius. Generally, the landscape is characterized by steep slopes and deep ravines, although in some regions there will be the occasional luscious valley. In the cloud forest of the Sierra Mazateca in Northern Oaxaca (around a 5-6hr drive South East of Mexico City), the local people make a divide between two zones: the Mazateca Alta (high altitude and cold areas) and the Mazateca Baja (low altitude areas where the temperatures are moderate). Traditionally known by its Aztec name Teutitlan, the Sierra Mazateca is considered ‘The Divine Land’, probably called this way because of the intrinsic spiritual devotion of its people, the Mazatecas, in combination with the richness of its biodiversity.
Here’s Michael Stuart Ani on his last visit to the Mazateca cloud forest, telling us that this is the only place where the well-known psychoactive divine sage (salvia divinorum) is still growing in the wild.
Like other areas in Oaxaca, the Sierra Mazateca also has a rich cultural history. There is evidence scattered all over the region of artifacts and human settlements dating back to 750 – 500 BC. The population of the mountain villages scattered out over the valleys, is now made up of indigenous Mazateca, a group of about 26,000 people. Not much is known about their ancestry, but they are believed to be descendants of the Nonoalca- Chichimeca from Tula (the capital and sacred city of the Toltec people), who settled in these mountains at the beginning of the 12th century. The Mazateca language also bares a lot of resemblance to chapanecan, a native dialect that is now extinct but used to be spoken in what is now Nicaragua.
The name Mazatecas was given to them by their neighbouring Nahuatl, meaning ‘Deer People’. The reason they were called Deer People is because their land was abundant with deer and because they worship a deer figurine, usually carried with them as a totem. But the Mazateca prefer to go by their name ‘Ha Shuta Enima’, meaning something like ‘workers of the mountains, humble people of custom.’
Shortly after their arrival in the early 12th century, the people of the Sierra Mazateca had divided the land into two Kingdoms, one of the West (the Mazateca Baja) and one of the East (the Mazateca Alta). Not long before the Spaniards arrived there, these kingdoms were overthrown repeatedly by the Mexica, better known as Aztec, who reigned over this region for almost a century until the arrival of the conquistadors and Christian missionaries from 1542.
After this point onwards, not a lot is known about the cultural development of the Mazatecas, as many of them were dispursed into tiny villages or died from diseases that were introduced by the Spanish. Furthermore, the vivid culture of these people and display of their religious beliefs were actively suppressed by the conquistadores, they persecuted anyone who held opposing religious beliefs, which drastically changed the way the religion was practiced. Many of the Mazateca ceremonies used to take place publicly, but because of these restrictions and punishments, were forced to be held hidden and kept a secret. Many even converted to Christianity.
Today the indigenous society is being transformed by the forces of history. Until only recently, isolated from the modern world, the indigenous people lived in their mountains as people lived in the neolithic. There were only paths and they walked everywhere they went. Trains of burros carried out the principal crop-coffee-to the markets in the plain. Now roads have been built, blasted out of rock and constructed along the edges of the mountains over precipices to connect the community with the society beyond. The children are people of opposites: just as they speak two languages, Mazatec and Spanish, they live between two times: the timeless, cyclical time of recurrence of the People of the Deer and the time of progress, change and development of modern Mexico.
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-2-the-cloud-forests-of-the-sierra-mazateca/
Modern Revival of Plant Medicine and the Psychedelic 60s
After the conquest of Mesoamerica, the secret of the sacred mushrooms remained a secret for almost 3 centuries, until a Spaniard named Julian Diaz-Ordaz decided to build a coffee plantation in the Sierra Mazateca in 1882. Ordaz was an expert mycologist from the mushroom capitol of Europe: Catalunya. Guess where he decided to build his plantation? That’s right, in the exact region where the sacred mushrooms grew and where its rituals and ceremonies were still practiced in secret by the local Indians.
During the Mexican Revolution of 1912, General Emiliano Zapata drove Ordaz out of Southern Mexico with the rest of the European hacienda owners. Julian Ordaz returned to Europe with the first stories about the sacred mushrooms. Unfortunately for Ordaz, no one believed what they thought of as ‘tall tales’. At the time, peyote and mescaline rituals had reached Berlin and the scientific scholars erroneously wrote the sacred mushroom off as being mistaken for peyote.
Cameron Townsend, the founder of the Summer Linguistics Institute and Wycliffe fundamentalist Christian cult, heard about Ordaz’s find from an associate in Mexico’s pre-World War II German community. At the time German occultists were scouring the earth from Tibet to Mexico looking to the past for answers to address an uncertain technological future. Townsend had already embarked on a similar journey and as part of his research he sent an undercover missionary disguised as a linguist expert to Huautla in 1936. Eunice Pike was the first outsider to publish writing on the ‘poison mushroom’ rituals of the Sierra Mazateca. Both Eunice Pike and Cameron Townsend believed that the Indians’ mythological Plumed Serpent was actually the Beast of Revelations and the mushroom was its seed, which could be used to conjure it into existence. They withheld their information to fulfill their own prophecy of 2,000 Tribes at the 1964 New York World Fair.
Back down in ole’ Mexico, an anthropologist named Reko and the head of the ethno-biology department at Harvard, Richard Evans Shultes, who was also a pre-CIA operative, had learned about the sacred mushrooms through Eunice Pike. The agency became interested in studying its possible military uses. No one had actually taken part in a Mazateca ritual involving Desheto (velada) until the French botanist, Heim, who began documenting species. In 1954, his associate R. Gordon Wasson, the man who opened the sacred mushroom’s Pandora’s box, arrived in Huautla.
When Wasson arrived, he met the priest of Huautla’s Catholic church, who was not only aware of the sacred mushroom, but had actually had a religious experience with them. After Eunice Pike refused to help Wasson, the priest introduced him to Maria Sabina. Wasson, a mushroom expert, was astonished by his first velada ceremony with Maria Sabina, who was also a devote member of the Catholic church in Huautla.
Wasson believed the mushrooms allowed him to communicate with his recently deceased mother. This understanding was quite out of the box for a conservative New York banker. Wasson was also the first to discover and publish evidence from the codices of the sacred mushrooms’ importance to Mesoamerican culture. He also promoted a theory that the sacred mushroom could be the actual Fruit of Knowledge, which are described in the earliest versions of the Bible.
Even though Wasson was a conservative military supporter, he was still appalled by the concept of the American secret services using something so sacred for violent reasons and decided that the only way to stop this was to finally reveal the sacred mushrooms secret. In 1957 Wasson published an article and photographs in Life Magazine about a Mazatec Indian woman who could literally communicate with the dead using sacred mushrooms. It was a uniquely odd article for a major publication in post, World War II 1950’s America. This was an era when all religious beliefs except for Christianity were being written off as ignorant superstition. It was actually Disney who took the occult practices of the world and white washed them into cartoon fairytales and dancing mushrooms. With the exception of Wasson’s article, the entire religious belief system of the world was now being transformed into a standardized template that fit the new American model of the modern technological age.
In the 1960’s, Dr. Timothy Leary, a visiting professor at Harvard, was part of a group of scientists who believed that better living through chemistry would solve all the world’s problems. Leary read Wasson’s article in Life Magazine and was more enthralled by the psychological possibilities than Wasson’s interest in the ‘primitive culture’, that worshipped the sacred mushroom. Leary immediately went to Southern Mexico to experiment with the sacred mushroom and it literally blew his mind. Soon after returning, he wrote the book ‘The Psychedelic Experience’.
Back in the US, Leary found it more comfortable to use a synthesized chemical in a safe environment then he did, tromping through the dangerous backcountry of Mexico. This is when he began experimenting with psilocybin, and then Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD). He administered what he felt was a miraculous drug to some of his students and ultimately that one mushroom experience changed the mindset of the entire world and contributed to the era known as the ‘Psychedelic Sixties’.
The US government was angered by Wasson and Leary’s leak and were forced to coverup their own research into the possible military uses of the sacred mushroom. In 1967, the US government outlawed the use of psilocybin and LSD and this caused a counterculture use of these drugs that continues to this day.
It was also right around the start of ‘The War on Drugs’ when our project director and author of the book The Ghost Dance Michael Stuart Ani arrived to the Sierra Mazateca…
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-3-the-secret-story-of-the-sacred-mushroom/
The White Man's mushroom
Michael Stuart Ani arrived in the Mazateca at the end of the sixties, shortly after the first dirt road was built. It took him a fourteen-hour life and death, white knuckle, ride to get up the mountain. With the new road, a flood of rock stars like John Lennon, Bob Dylan and Mick Jagger and their fans invaded the hamlet of Huautla, looking for a more natural way to ‘expand their consciousness’ than through LSD. Caught in a quagmire, the locals who were living in poverty were trapped between the possibility of making money and their deepest beliefs. They wanted to sell the tourists mushrooms but were deeply afraid of the taboos of a mushroom whose name could not even be mentioned.
To work around this conflict the local Indians avoided using the name Desheto and began to call them ‘derumbes’, the Spanish word for landslide, since so many strains of psychoactive mushrooms in the Mazateca grew in landslides. After the hippies turned the Mazatecan’s most sacred ritual into a guitar strumming drug and sex festival, the municipal president of Huautla outlawed the mushroom’s sale. He did allow the desperately poor locals to sell the plentiful Psilocybin Cubensis mushrooms they called ‘San Isidros’ which grew from Brahman cow dung and sugarcane fields. This is the mushroom that became known in popular culture as the ‘Magic Mushroom’.
The local people never ate this mushroom, they believed it was the mushroom of white men’s saints because it grew in the waste (cow dung) of animals that Europeans had introduced to the region. They saw no connection between the San Isidros and their own ancient culture. At some point in this era a myth arose that these magic mushrooms could show you where treasures were buried because the Indians believed that the hippies came to eat them so they could find treasures and become rich like the rock stars. But the hippies and rock stars were not conditioned to survive in the harsh rural conditions and left before the Mexican military closed Huautla off to the outside world.
It was during this time that Michael stayed behind. Avoiding Huautla completely, he moved to the most remote side of the mountain where the tropical cloud forests were located and where Desheto actually grew. The people of Huautla claimed that the Indians of the forest would rob and kill any outsiders, but they allowed him to stay because they believed that Desheto had brought him there with a purpose. For over thirty-years he was the only outsider they allowed to live there (since the time that Ordaz was driven out by Zapata)
During the first six years Michael lived there he found 107 different varieties of psychoactive mushrooms. Most of these varieties were the derrumbes or psilocybin mushrooms. At the time and mostly for their curative properties, the locals only ate a handful of strains that grew in the deep interior of the virgin cloud forest. The Che-ney and Te-hey, healers and witches of the region, used many different strains for particular ceremonies and effects. Each one appears to have unique properties. In general, the deep forest varieties were referred to, in a whispered reverence, as Desheto. The others were called Little Birds, Clowns, Blue Bleeders and Landslide mushrooms. Since then, almost 200 different species of psilocybin mushrooms have been scientifically classified. The difference between many of these and Desheto is that Desheto causes a pure visionary possession with very little if any of the psychedelic twinkle and tripping feeling of psilocybin mushrooms.
Of course, the meaning of the word Desheto is also shrouded in mystery. Wassons’ definition of the word comes from Maria Sabina who called them ‘That which spring forth on its own’. But this definition has inherent problems. In Mazatec, you would not use the word Desheto to explain a spring of water or anything else that appears to spring forth on its own. The word has an archaic meaning that has long since been lost in translation. Michaels’ guess is that it implies something that comes from somewhere else, as Desheto claims it is not originally from the Mazateca but came to hide there in ancient times.
The rules and taboo about the picking and ritual uses of the mushroom were still very strict as recently as fifty-years ago, which was the time that Mazatecans were first questioning the true meaning of their ancient guarded secret. The mushrooms had to be tapped on the cap to release their spores and pulled out with their root intact. They could not be shown to anyone and only cleaned by a virgin maiden. Sex was prohibited and breaking this rule could end in the birth of snakes and rats or complete insanity.
The famed writer of the Don Juan books, Carlos Castenada, visited the outskirts of the region for two weeks at a time but was never allowed near the sacred cloud forest. In his books he created a popular myth that still exists today, which is that there is a type of academic apprenticeship program where medicine people teach you to become a ‘shaman’. However, this seems to be contrary to the beliefs of the region, where it is believed that you can only learn about Desheto directly from the source.
Eversince the invention of this myth, three of the four Desheto strains previously known and given scientific names by Michael, have gone extinct. The locals believe that their demise came from the over harvesting of Cedar and other specific tree species. Some of the mushrooms’ scientific names we don’t know, if they even have them. The first two extinct strains were giants that could grow to well over a foot tall and are thick and heavy. They have a clear translucent and hollow stem and a brilliant black or yellowish tan cap. These are the only varieties that are not eaten in pairs so their journey to the land of the dead won’t be lonely. The last extinct strain of Desheto, as opposed to derrumbe, is about three inches tall and its stem resembles a shriveled finger after a hot bath and the cap unfolds into a perfect star. The last remaining one is about seven to eight inches tall and is the exact color of the local people’s bronze skin.
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-5-the-white-mans-mushroom/
In the final part of this series, we will address;
submitted by ONightingale to shrooms [link] [comments]


2018.10.10 12:29 ONightingale Tracing the spores of the Desheto mushroom to the impenetrable Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca

‘Tracing the Steps of the Ghost Dance’ is a storytelling project about the importance of the ancient relationship between people, plants and their environment. Using the Ghost Dance ritual as our case study; we follow the spores of the Desheto mushroom to the impenetrable and majestic Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca. This project being led by our Americas project director Michael Stuart Ani, who has been a student of plant wisdom for fifty years with a deep connection to the Lakota, Yamomami and Mazateca.
To read the introduction of this journey, see here.
The Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca
To trace the steps of the Ghost Dance further, we need to look at the type of geography and cultural offset it originated from. In Mexico, cloud forests account for approximately 0,6% – 1% of its territory, yet they harbour about 10% of the countries’ plant species. Cloud forests are therefore priority regions for biodiversity research and conservation efforts. However, despite them being the predominant type of vegetation in mountainous areas (speaking of 1,000 meters – 2,500 meters), human activities have reduced these forests to mere fragments.
So what makes Cloud Forests so unique? These forests have a constant cloud coverage, making them extremely humid but relatively cold with temperatures up until 23 degrees celsius. Generally, the landscape is characterized by steep slopes and deep ravines, although in some regions there will be the occasional luscious valley. In the cloud forest of the Sierra Mazateca in Northern Oaxaca (around a 5-6hr drive South East of Mexico City), the local people make a divide between two zones: the Mazateca Alta (high altitude and cold areas) and the Mazateca Baja (low altitude areas where the temperatures are moderate). Traditionally known by its Aztec name Teutitlan, the Sierra Mazateca is considered ‘The Divine Land’, probably called this way because of the intrinsic spiritual devotion of its people, the Mazatecas, in combination with the richness of its biodiversity.
Here’s Michael Stuart Ani on his last visit to the Mazateca cloud forest, telling us that this is the only place where the well-known psychoactive divine sage (salvia divinorum) is still growing in the wild.
Like other areas in Oaxaca, the Sierra Mazateca also has a rich cultural history. There is evidence scattered all over the region of artifacts and human settlements dating back to 750 – 500 BC. The population of the mountain villages scattered out over the valleys, is now made up of indigenous Mazateca, a group of about 26,000 people. Not much is known about their ancestry, but they are believed to be descendants of the Nonoalca- Chichimeca from Tula (the capital and sacred city of the Toltec people), who settled in these mountains at the beginning of the 12th century. The Mazateca language also bares a lot of resemblance to chapanecan, a native dialect that is now extinct but used to be spoken in what is now Nicaragua.
The name Mazatecas was given to them by their neighbouring Nahuatl, meaning ‘Deer People’. The reason they were called Deer People is because their land was abundant with deer and because they worship a deer figurine, usually carried with them as a totem. But the Mazateca prefer to go by their name ‘Ha Shuta Enima’, meaning something like ‘workers of the mountains, humble people of custom.’
Shortly after their arrival in the early 12th century, the people of the Sierra Mazateca had divided the land into two Kingdoms, one of the West (the Mazateca Baja) and one of the East (the Mazateca Alta). Not long before the Spaniards arrived there, these kingdoms were overthrown repeatedly by the Mexica, better known as Aztec, who reigned over this region for almost a century until the arrival of the conquistadors and Christian missionaries from 1542.
After this point onwards, not a lot is known about the cultural development of the Mazatecas, as many of them were dispursed into tiny villages or died from diseases that were introduced by the Spanish. Furthermore, the vivid culture of these people and display of their religious beliefs were actively suppressed by the conquistadores, they persecuted anyone who held opposing religious beliefs, which drastically changed the way the religion was practiced. Many of the Mazateca ceremonies used to take place publicly, but because of these restrictions and punishments, were forced to be held hidden and kept a secret. Many even converted to Christianity.
Today the indigenous society is being transformed by the forces of history. Until only recently, isolated from the modern world, the indigenous people lived in their mountains as people lived in the neolithic. There were only paths and they walked everywhere they went. Trains of burros carried out the principal crop-coffee-to the markets in the plain. Now roads have been built, blasted out of rock and constructed along the edges of the mountains over precipices to connect the community with the society beyond. The children are people of opposites: just as they speak two languages, Mazatec and Spanish, they live between two times: the timeless, cyclical time of recurrence of the People of the Deer and the time of progress, change and development of modern Mexico.
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-2-the-cloud-forests-of-the-sierra-mazateca/
Modern Revival of Plant Medicine and the Psychedelic 60s
After the conquest of Mesoamerica, the secret of the sacred mushrooms remained a secret for almost 3 centuries, until a Spaniard named Julian Diaz-Ordaz decided to build a coffee plantation in the Sierra Mazateca in 1882. Ordaz was an expert mycologist from the mushroom capitol of Europe: Catalunya. Guess where he decided to build his plantation? That’s right, in the exact region where the sacred mushrooms grew and where its rituals and ceremonies were still practiced in secret by the local Indians.
During the Mexican Revolution of 1912, General Emiliano Zapata drove Ordaz out of Southern Mexico with the rest of the European hacienda owners. Julian Ordaz returned to Europe with the first stories about the sacred mushrooms. Unfortunately for Ordaz, no one believed what they thought of as ‘tall tales’. At the time, peyote and mescaline rituals had reached Berlin and the scientific scholars erroneously wrote the sacred mushroom off as being mistaken for peyote.
Cameron Townsend, the founder of the Summer Linguistics Institute and Wycliffe fundamentalist Christian cult, heard about Ordaz’s find from an associate in Mexico’s pre-World War II German community. At the time German occultists were scouring the earth from Tibet to Mexico looking to the past for answers to address an uncertain technological future. Townsend had already embarked on a similar journey and as part of his research he sent an undercover missionary disguised as a linguist expert to Huautla in 1936. Eunice Pike was the first outsider to publish writing on the ‘poison mushroom’ rituals of the Sierra Mazateca. Both Eunice Pike and Cameron Townsend believed that the Indians’ mythological Plumed Serpent was actually the Beast of Revelations and the mushroom was its seed, which could be used to conjure it into existence. They withheld their information to fulfill their own prophecy of 2,000 Tribes at the 1964 New York World Fair.
Back down in ole’ Mexico, an anthropologist named Reko and the head of the ethno-biology department at Harvard, Richard Evans Shultes, who was also a pre-CIA operative, had learned about the sacred mushrooms through Eunice Pike. The agency became interested in studying its possible military uses. No one had actually taken part in a Mazateca ritual involving Desheto (velada) until the French botanist, Heim, who began documenting species. In 1954, his associate R. Gordon Wasson, the man who opened the sacred mushroom’s Pandora’s box, arrived in Huautla.
When Wasson arrived, he met the priest of Huautla’s Catholic church, who was not only aware of the sacred mushroom, but had actually had a religious experience with them. After Eunice Pike refused to help Wasson, the priest introduced him to Maria Sabina. Wasson, a mushroom expert, was astonished by his first velada ceremony with Maria Sabina, who was also a devote member of the Catholic church in Huautla.
Wasson believed the mushrooms allowed him to communicate with his recently deceased mother. This understanding was quite out of the box for a conservative New York banker. Wasson was also the first to discover and publish evidence from the codices of the sacred mushrooms’ importance to Mesoamerican culture. He also promoted a theory that the sacred mushroom could be the actual Fruit of Knowledge, which are described in the earliest versions of the Bible.
Even though Wasson was a conservative military supporter, he was still appalled by the concept of the American secret services using something so sacred for violent reasons and decided that the only way to stop this was to finally reveal the sacred mushrooms secret. In 1957 Wasson published an article and photographs in Life Magazine about a Mazatec Indian woman who could literally communicate with the dead using sacred mushrooms. It was a uniquely odd article for a major publication in post, World War II 1950’s America. This was an era when all religious beliefs except for Christianity were being written off as ignorant superstition. It was actually Disney who took the occult practices of the world and white washed them into cartoon fairytales and dancing mushrooms. With the exception of Wasson’s article, the entire religious belief system of the world was now being transformed into a standardized template that fit the new American model of the modern technological age.
In the 1960’s, Dr. Timothy Leary, a visiting professor at Harvard, was part of a group of scientists who believed that better living through chemistry would solve all the world’s problems. Leary read Wasson’s article in Life Magazine and was more enthralled by the psychological possibilities than Wasson’s interest in the ‘primitive culture’, that worshipped the sacred mushroom. Leary immediately went to Southern Mexico to experiment with the sacred mushroom and it literally blew his mind. Soon after returning, he wrote the book ‘The Psychedelic Experience’.
Back in the US, Leary found it more comfortable to use a synthesized chemical in a safe environment then he did, tromping through the dangerous backcountry of Mexico. This is when he began experimenting with psilocybin, and then Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD). He administered what he felt was a miraculous drug to some of his students and ultimately that one mushroom experience changed the mindset of the entire world and contributed to the era known as the ‘Psychedelic Sixties’.
The US government was angered by Wasson and Leary’s leak and were forced to coverup their own research into the possible military uses of the sacred mushroom. In 1967, the US government outlawed the use of psilocybin and LSD and this caused a counterculture use of these drugs that continues to this day.
It was also right around the start of ‘The War on Drugs’ when our project director and author of the book The Ghost Dance Michael Stuart Ani arrived to the Sierra Mazateca…
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-3-the-secret-story-of-the-sacred-mushroom/
The White Man's mushroom
Michael Stuart Ani arrived in the Mazateca at the end of the sixties, shortly after the first dirt road was built. It took him a fourteen-hour life and death, white knuckle, ride to get up the mountain. With the new road, a flood of rock stars like John Lennon, Bob Dylan and Mick Jagger and their fans invaded the hamlet of Huautla, looking for a more natural way to ‘expand their consciousness’ than through LSD. Caught in a quagmire, the locals who were living in poverty were trapped between the possibility of making money and their deepest beliefs. They wanted to sell the tourists mushrooms but were deeply afraid of the taboos of a mushroom whose name could not even be mentioned.
To work around this conflict the local Indians avoided using the name Desheto and began to call them ‘derumbes’, the Spanish word for landslide, since so many strains of psychoactive mushrooms in the Mazateca grew in landslides. After the hippies turned the Mazatecan’s most sacred ritual into a guitar strumming drug and sex festival, the municipal president of Huautla outlawed the mushroom’s sale. He did allow the desperately poor locals to sell the plentiful Psilocybin Cubensis mushrooms they called ‘San Isidros’ which grew from Brahman cow dung and sugarcane fields. This is the mushroom that became known in popular culture as the ‘Magic Mushroom’.
The local people never ate this mushroom, they believed it was the mushroom of white men’s saints because it grew in the waste (cow dung) of animals that Europeans had introduced to the region. They saw no connection between the San Isidros and their own ancient culture. At some point in this era a myth arose that these magic mushrooms could show you where treasures were buried because the Indians believed that the hippies came to eat them so they could find treasures and become rich like the rock stars. But the hippies and rock stars were not conditioned to survive in the harsh rural conditions and left before the Mexican military closed Huautla off to the outside world.
It was during this time that Michael stayed behind. Avoiding Huautla completely, he moved to the most remote side of the mountain where the tropical cloud forests were located and where Desheto actually grew. The people of Huautla claimed that the Indians of the forest would rob and kill any outsiders, but they allowed him to stay because they believed that Desheto had brought him there with a purpose. For over thirty-years he was the only outsider they allowed to live there (since the time that Ordaz was driven out by Zapata)
During the first six years Michael lived there he found 107 different varieties of psychoactive mushrooms. Most of these varieties were the derrumbes or psilocybin mushrooms. At the time and mostly for their curative properties, the locals only ate a handful of strains that grew in the deep interior of the virgin cloud forest. The Che-ney and Te-hey, healers and witches of the region, used many different strains for particular ceremonies and effects. Each one appears to have unique properties. In general, the deep forest varieties were referred to, in a whispered reverence, as Desheto. The others were called Little Birds, Clowns, Blue Bleeders and Landslide mushrooms. Since then, almost 200 different species of psilocybin mushrooms have been scientifically classified. The difference between many of these and Desheto is that Desheto causes a pure visionary possession with very little if any of the psychedelic twinkle and tripping feeling of psilocybin mushrooms.
Of course, the meaning of the word Desheto is also shrouded in mystery. Wassons’ definition of the word comes from Maria Sabina who called them ‘That which spring forth on its own’. But this definition has inherent problems. In Mazatec, you would not use the word Desheto to explain a spring of water or anything else that appears to spring forth on its own. The word has an archaic meaning that has long since been lost in translation. Michaels’ guess is that it implies something that comes from somewhere else, as Desheto claims it is not originally from the Mazateca but came to hide there in ancient times.
The rules and taboo about the picking and ritual uses of the mushroom were still very strict as recently as fifty-years ago, which was the time that Mazatecans were first questioning the true meaning of their ancient guarded secret. The mushrooms had to be tapped on the cap to release their spores and pulled out with their root intact. They could not be shown to anyone and only cleaned by a virgin maiden. Sex was prohibited and breaking this rule could end in the birth of snakes and rats or complete insanity.
The famed writer of the Don Juan books, Carlos Castenada, visited the outskirts of the region for two weeks at a time but was never allowed near the sacred cloud forest. In his books he created a popular myth that still exists today, which is that there is a type of academic apprenticeship program where medicine people teach you to become a ‘shaman’. However, this seems to be contrary to the beliefs of the region, where it is believed that you can only learn about Desheto directly from the source.
Eversince the invention of this myth, three of the four Desheto strains previously known and given scientific names by Michael, have gone extinct. The locals believe that their demise came from the over harvesting of Cedar and other specific tree species. Some of the mushrooms’ scientific names we don’t know, if they even have them. The first two extinct strains were giants that could grow to well over a foot tall and are thick and heavy. They have a clear translucent and hollow stem and a brilliant black or yellowish tan cap. These are the only varieties that are not eaten in pairs so their journey to the land of the dead won’t be lonely. The last extinct strain of Desheto, as opposed to derrumbe, is about three inches tall and its stem resembles a shriveled finger after a hot bath and the cap unfolds into a perfect star. The last remaining one is about seven to eight inches tall and is the exact color of the local people’s bronze skin.
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-5-the-white-mans-mushroom/
In the final part of this series, we will address;
submitted by ONightingale to TailEater [link] [comments]


2018.10.10 12:18 ONightingale Tracing the Steps of the Ghost Dance back to the Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca

‘Tracing the Steps of the Ghost Dance’ is a storytelling project about the importance of the ancient relationship between people, plants and their environment. Using the Ghost Dance ritual as our case study; we follow the spores of the Desheto mushroom to the impenetrable and majestic Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca. This project being led by our Americas project director Michael Stuart Ani, who has been a student of plant wisdom for fifty years with a deep connection to the Lakota, Yamomami and Mazateca.
To read the introduction of this journey, see here.
The Cloud Forests of the Sierra Mazateca
To trace the steps of the Ghost Dance further, we need to look at the type of geography and cultural offset it originated from. In Mexico, cloud forests account for approximately 0,6% – 1% of its territory, yet they harbour about 10% of the countries’ plant species. Cloud forests are therefore priority regions for biodiversity research and conservation efforts. However, despite them being the predominant type of vegetation in mountainous areas (speaking of 1,000 meters – 2,500 meters), human activities have reduced these forests to mere fragments.
So what makes Cloud Forests so unique? These forests have a constant cloud coverage, making them extremely humid but relatively cold with temperatures up until 23 degrees celsius. Generally, the landscape is characterized by steep slopes and deep ravines, although in some regions there will be the occasional luscious valley. In the cloud forest of the Sierra Mazateca in Northern Oaxaca (around a 5-6hr drive South East of Mexico City), the local people make a divide between two zones: the Mazateca Alta (high altitude and cold areas) and the Mazateca Baja (low altitude areas where the temperatures are moderate). Traditionally known by its Aztec name Teutitlan, the Sierra Mazateca is considered ‘The Divine Land’, probably called this way because of the intrinsic spiritual devotion of its people, the Mazatecas, in combination with the richness of its biodiversity.
Here’s Michael Stuart Ani on his last visit to the Mazateca cloud forest, telling us that this is the only place where the well-known psychoactive divine sage (salvia divinorum) is still growing in the wild.
Like other areas in Oaxaca, the Sierra Mazateca also has a rich cultural history. There is evidence scattered all over the region of artifacts and human settlements dating back to 750 – 500 BC. The population of the mountain villages scattered out over the valleys, is now made up of indigenous Mazateca, a group of about 26,000 people. Not much is known about their ancestry, but they are believed to be descendants of the Nonoalca- Chichimeca from Tula (the capital and sacred city of the Toltec people), who settled in these mountains at the beginning of the 12th century. The Mazateca language also bares a lot of resemblance to chapanecan, a native dialect that is now extinct but used to be spoken in what is now Nicaragua.
The name Mazatecas was given to them by their neighbouring Nahuatl, meaning ‘Deer People’. The reason they were called Deer People is because their land was abundant with deer and because they worship a deer figurine, usually carried with them as a totem. But the Mazateca prefer to go by their name ‘Ha Shuta Enima’, meaning something like ‘workers of the mountains, humble people of custom.’
Shortly after their arrival in the early 12th century, the people of the Sierra Mazateca had divided the land into two Kingdoms, one of the West (the Mazateca Baja) and one of the East (the Mazateca Alta). Not long before the Spaniards arrived there, these kingdoms were overthrown repeatedly by the Mexica, better known as Aztec, who reigned over this region for almost a century until the arrival of the conquistadors and Christian missionaries from 1542.
After this point onwards, not a lot is known about the cultural development of the Mazatecas, as many of them were dispursed into tiny villages or died from diseases that were introduced by the Spanish. Furthermore, the vivid culture of these people and display of their religious beliefs were actively suppressed by the conquistadores, they persecuted anyone who held opposing religious beliefs, which drastically changed the way the religion was practiced. Many of the Mazateca ceremonies used to take place publicly, but because of these restrictions and punishments, were forced to be held hidden and kept a secret. Many even converted to Christianity.
Today the indigenous society is being transformed by the forces of history. Until only recently, isolated from the modern world, the indigenous people lived in their mountains as people lived in the neolithic. There were only paths and they walked everywhere they went. Trains of burros carried out the principal crop-coffee-to the markets in the plain. Now roads have been built, blasted out of rock and constructed along the edges of the mountains over precipices to connect the community with the society beyond. The children are people of opposites: just as they speak two languages, Mazatec and Spanish, they live between two times: the timeless, cyclical time of recurrence of the People of the Deer and the time of progress, change and development of modern Mexico.
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-2-the-cloud-forests-of-the-sierra-mazateca/
Modern Revival of Plant Medicine and the Psychedelic 60s
After the conquest of Mesoamerica, the secret of the sacred mushrooms remained a secret for almost 3 centuries, until a Spaniard named Julian Diaz-Ordaz decided to build a coffee plantation in the Sierra Mazateca in 1882. Ordaz was an expert mycologist from the mushroom capitol of Europe: Catalunya. Guess where he decided to build his plantation? That’s right, in the exact region where the sacred mushrooms grew and where its rituals and ceremonies were still practiced in secret by the local Indians.
During the Mexican Revolution of 1912, General Emiliano Zapata drove Ordaz out of Southern Mexico with the rest of the European hacienda owners. Julian Ordaz returned to Europe with the first stories about the sacred mushrooms. Unfortunately for Ordaz, no one believed what they thought of as ‘tall tales’. At the time, peyote and mescaline rituals had reached Berlin and the scientific scholars erroneously wrote the sacred mushroom off as being mistaken for peyote.
Cameron Townsend, the founder of the Summer Linguistics Institute and Wycliffe fundamentalist Christian cult, heard about Ordaz’s find from an associate in Mexico’s pre-World War II German community. At the time German occultists were scouring the earth from Tibet to Mexico looking to the past for answers to address an uncertain technological future. Townsend had already embarked on a similar journey and as part of his research he sent an undercover missionary disguised as a linguist expert to Huautla in 1936. Eunice Pike was the first outsider to publish writing on the ‘poison mushroom’ rituals of the Sierra Mazateca. Both Eunice Pike and Cameron Townsend believed that the Indians’ mythological Plumed Serpent was actually the Beast of Revelations and the mushroom was its seed, which could be used to conjure it into existence. They withheld their information to fulfill their own prophecy of 2,000 Tribes at the 1964 New York World Fair.
Back down in ole’ Mexico, an anthropologist named Reko and the head of the ethno-biology department at Harvard, Richard Evans Shultes, who was also a pre-CIA operative, had learned about the sacred mushrooms through Eunice Pike. The agency became interested in studying its possible military uses. No one had actually taken part in a Mazateca ritual involving Desheto (velada) until the French botanist, Heim, who began documenting species. In 1954, his associate R. Gordon Wasson, the man who opened the sacred mushroom’s Pandora’s box, arrived in Huautla.
When Wasson arrived, he met the priest of Huautla’s Catholic church, who was not only aware of the sacred mushroom, but had actually had a religious experience with them. After Eunice Pike refused to help Wasson, the priest introduced him to Maria Sabina. Wasson, a mushroom expert, was astonished by his first velada ceremony with Maria Sabina, who was also a devote member of the Catholic church in Huautla.
Wasson believed the mushrooms allowed him to communicate with his recently deceased mother. This understanding was quite out of the box for a conservative New York banker. Wasson was also the first to discover and publish evidence from the codices of the sacred mushrooms’ importance to Mesoamerican culture. He also promoted a theory that the sacred mushroom could be the actual Fruit of Knowledge, which are described in the earliest versions of the Bible.
Even though Wasson was a conservative military supporter, he was still appalled by the concept of the American secret services using something so sacred for violent reasons and decided that the only way to stop this was to finally reveal the sacred mushrooms secret. In 1957 Wasson published an article and photographs in Life Magazine about a Mazatec Indian woman who could literally communicate with the dead using sacred mushrooms. It was a uniquely odd article for a major publication in post, World War II 1950’s America. This was an era when all religious beliefs except for Christianity were being written off as ignorant superstition. It was actually Disney who took the occult practices of the world and white washed them into cartoon fairytales and dancing mushrooms. With the exception of Wasson’s article, the entire religious belief system of the world was now being transformed into a standardized template that fit the new American model of the modern technological age.
In the 1960’s, Dr. Timothy Leary, a visiting professor at Harvard, was part of a group of scientists who believed that better living through chemistry would solve all the world’s problems. Leary read Wasson’s article in Life Magazine and was more enthralled by the psychological possibilities than Wasson’s interest in the ‘primitive culture’, that worshipped the sacred mushroom. Leary immediately went to Southern Mexico to experiment with the sacred mushroom and it literally blew his mind. Soon after returning, he wrote the book ‘The Psychedelic Experience’.
Back in the US, Leary found it more comfortable to use a synthesized chemical in a safe environment then he did, tromping through the dangerous backcountry of Mexico. This is when he began experimenting with psilocybin, and then Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD). He administered what he felt was a miraculous drug to some of his students and ultimately that one mushroom experience changed the mindset of the entire world and contributed to the era known as the ‘Psychedelic Sixties’.
The US government was angered by Wasson and Leary’s leak and were forced to coverup their own research into the possible military uses of the sacred mushroom. In 1967, the US government outlawed the use of psilocybin and LSD and this caused a counterculture use of these drugs that continues to this day.
It was also right around the start of ‘The War on Drugs’ when our project director and author of the book The Ghost Dance Michael Stuart Ani arrived to the Sierra Mazateca…
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-3-the-secret-story-of-the-sacred-mushroom/
The White Man's mushroom
Michael Stuart Ani arrived in the Mazateca at the end of the sixties, shortly after the first dirt road was built. It took him a fourteen-hour life and death, white knuckle, ride to get up the mountain. With the new road, a flood of rock stars like John Lennon, Bob Dylan and Mick Jagger and their fans invaded the hamlet of Huautla, looking for a more natural way to ‘expand their consciousness’ than through LSD. Caught in a quagmire, the locals who were living in poverty were trapped between the possibility of making money and their deepest beliefs. They wanted to sell the tourists mushrooms but were deeply afraid of the taboos of a mushroom whose name could not even be mentioned.
To work around this conflict the local Indians avoided using the name Desheto and began to call them ‘derumbes’, the Spanish word for landslide, since so many strains of psychoactive mushrooms in the Mazateca grew in landslides. After the hippies turned the Mazatecan’s most sacred ritual into a guitar strumming drug and sex festival, the municipal president of Huautla outlawed the mushroom’s sale. He did allow the desperately poor locals to sell the plentiful Psilocybin Cubensis mushrooms they called ‘San Isidros’ which grew from Brahman cow dung and sugarcane fields. This is the mushroom that became known in popular culture as the ‘Magic Mushroom’.
The local people never ate this mushroom, they believed it was the mushroom of white men’s saints because it grew in the waste (cow dung) of animals that Europeans had introduced to the region. They saw no connection between the San Isidros and their own ancient culture. At some point in this era a myth arose that these magic mushrooms could show you where treasures were buried because the Indians believed that the hippies came to eat them so they could find treasures and become rich like the rock stars. But the hippies and rock stars were not conditioned to survive in the harsh rural conditions and left before the Mexican military closed Huautla off to the outside world.
It was during this time that Michael stayed behind. Avoiding Huautla completely, he moved to the most remote side of the mountain where the tropical cloud forests were located and where Desheto actually grew. The people of Huautla claimed that the Indians of the forest would rob and kill any outsiders, but they allowed him to stay because they believed that Desheto had brought him there with a purpose. For over thirty-years he was the only outsider they allowed to live there (since the time that Ordaz was driven out by Zapata)
During the first six years Michael lived there he found 107 different varieties of psychoactive mushrooms. Most of these varieties were the derrumbes or psilocybin mushrooms. At the time and mostly for their curative properties, the locals only ate a handful of strains that grew in the deep interior of the virgin cloud forest. The Che-ney and Te-hey, healers and witches of the region, used many different strains for particular ceremonies and effects. Each one appears to have unique properties. In general, the deep forest varieties were referred to, in a whispered reverence, as Desheto. The others were called Little Birds, Clowns, Blue Bleeders and Landslide mushrooms. Since then, almost 200 different species of psilocybin mushrooms have been scientifically classified. The difference between many of these and Desheto is that Desheto causes a pure visionary possession with very little if any of the psychedelic twinkle and tripping feeling of psilocybin mushrooms.
Of course, the meaning of the word Desheto is also shrouded in mystery. Wassons’ definition of the word comes from Maria Sabina who called them ‘That which spring forth on its own’. But this definition has inherent problems. In Mazatec, you would not use the word Desheto to explain a spring of water or anything else that appears to spring forth on its own. The word has an archaic meaning that has long since been lost in translation. Michaels’ guess is that it implies something that comes from somewhere else, as Desheto claims it is not originally from the Mazateca but came to hide there in ancient times.
The rules and taboo about the picking and ritual uses of the mushroom were still very strict as recently as fifty-years ago, which was the time that Mazatecans were first questioning the true meaning of their ancient guarded secret. The mushrooms had to be tapped on the cap to release their spores and pulled out with their root intact. They could not be shown to anyone and only cleaned by a virgin maiden. Sex was prohibited and breaking this rule could end in the birth of snakes and rats or complete insanity.
The famed writer of the Don Juan books, Carlos Castenada, visited the outskirts of the region for two weeks at a time but was never allowed near the sacred cloud forest. In his books he created a popular myth that still exists today, which is that there is a type of academic apprenticeship program where medicine people teach you to become a ‘shaman’. However, this seems to be contrary to the beliefs of the region, where it is believed that you can only learn about Desheto directly from the source.
Eversince the invention of this myth, three of the four Desheto strains previously known and given scientific names by Michael, have gone extinct. The locals believe that their demise came from the over harvesting of Cedar and other specific tree species. Some of the mushrooms’ scientific names we don’t know, if they even have them. The first two extinct strains were giants that could grow to well over a foot tall and are thick and heavy. They have a clear translucent and hollow stem and a brilliant black or yellowish tan cap. These are the only varieties that are not eaten in pairs so their journey to the land of the dead won’t be lonely. The last extinct strain of Desheto, as opposed to derrumbe, is about three inches tall and its stem resembles a shriveled finger after a hot bath and the cap unfolds into a perfect star. The last remaining one is about seven to eight inches tall and is the exact color of the local people’s bronze skin.
https://sinchi-foundation.com/news/part-5-the-white-mans-mushroom/
In the final part of this series, we will address;
submitted by ONightingale to environment [link] [comments]


2018.01.24 02:22 sconce2600 The List 2018: Who's out!

The Lineup has been released! Bold denotes acts that ended up on the lineup.
2017
2016
Out due to gigs at AT&T Park (Capacity: 41,915)/Levi's Stadium (Capacity: 75,000) in San Francisco and Santa Clara CA
Out due to gigs at Shoreline Amphitheatre (Capacity: 22,500) in Mountain View CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Oracle arena (Capacity: 19,596) in Oakland CA
Out due to gigs at the Golden One Center (Capacity: 17,608) in Sacramento CA
Out due to gigs at the SAP Center (Capacity: 17,496) in San Jose CA
Out due to gigs at the Concord Pavilion (Capacity: 12,500) in Concord CA (May through November)
Papa Murphy's Park at Cal Expo in Sacramento CA
Out due to gigs at the Greek Theatre (Capacity: 8,500) in Berkley CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at Bill Graham Civic Auditorium (Capacity: 7,000) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Masonic (Capacity: 3,165) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the City National Civic (Capacity: 2,850) in San Jose CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Warfield (Capacity: 2,300) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Mountain Winery (Capacity: 2,278) in Saratoga CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Fox theater (Capacity: 2,250) in Oakland CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at UC Theatre (Capacity: 1,400) in Berkley CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Fillmore (Capacity: 1,050) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Regency Ballroom (Capacity: 1,050) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the August Hall (Capacity : 1,000) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Mezzaine (Capacity: 1,000) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Uptown (Capacity: 863) in Napa CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Bimbo's 365 (Capacity: 685) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Great American Music Hall (Capacity: 600) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Cornerstone (Capacity: 600) in Berkeley CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Chapel (Capacity: 500) in San Francisco CA
Out due to gigs at the Slims (Capacity: 500) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to gigs at the Independent (Capacity: 500) in San Francisco CA (May through November)
Out due to playing Blurry Vision Fest in Oakland CA (May 12th-13th)
Out due to playing Bottlerock in Napa CA (May 26th-28th)
Out due to playing Clusterfest in San Francisco CA (June 1st-3rd)
Out due to playing Burger Boogaloo in Oakland CA (June 30th-July 1st)
Out due to playing Sonoma Harvest in Glen Ellen CA (September 22nd-23rd)
Out due to playing Flow festival in Finland (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Boardmasters festival in the UK (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Way out West festival in Sweden (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Smukfest in Denmark (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Oya Festival in Norway (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing SonneMondSterne Festival in Germany (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Boomtown Fair in the UK (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Haven Festival in Denmark (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to Sziget Festival in Hungary (same weekend as OSLs)
Out due to playing Haldren Pop Festival in Germany
Out for other reasons
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2017.09.11 21:51 Rooster_Ties Your first ever live concert with ANY kind of big-name artist? First ever JAZZ concert/show you remember having gone to?? And any other notable 'first' early concert experiences for you?

This first one is going to date me (or haunt me) -- probably both! (What can I say, I was born in 1969.)
July 2nd, 1986 - Julian Lennon (elder son of John Lennon), Municipal Opera in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri. (Summer between my junior and senior years of high school.)
My first JAZZ concert that I claim was the EitheOrchestra, circa 1990? (at a bar, The Cherry Street Brewing Company, Galesburg, IL) - roughly my sophomore year of college (had both John Medeski and Matt Wilson in the band at that time, both unknowns then).
The first jazz concert I actually ever heard was just a month or so before the E/O concert above -- Ed Shaughnessy and some "Tonight Show All-Stars" combo (sextet or maybe septet), at the Orpheum Theater, also in Galesburg. No idea who all was in the band, but guys from the Tonight Show back when Johnny was still hosting (in his last year or two before retirement).
The first "real" symphony performance I remember ever going to (something OTHER THAN field-trips to the St. Louis Symphony during the day, while I was in high school, or some local philharmonic of no real note) was the Chicago Symphony, circa 1989? - and I remember they played Mahler's 1st, "The Titan"!
The first "real" symphonic CHORAL concert I ever went to was at an American Choral Directors Association convention up in Chicago, circa 1990 - a double billing of Stravinsky's "Symphony of Psalms" and the Poulenc "Gloria".
submitted by Rooster_Ties to Jazz [link] [comments]


2017.03.25 11:00 emre23 March International Break Daily Discussion Thread: Wingers

Date Topic
20th Goalkeepers
21st Full Backs
22nd Centre Backs
23rd Defensive Midfielders
24th Central Midfielders
25th Wingers
26th Strikers
27th Formations & Tactics
28th U23s
29th U18s
Current Liverpool Wingers
2016-17 Appearances (Goals/Assists)
Player Age Contract Expiry Preferred Foot First Team Loan U23s U18s International Squad
Sadio Mané 24 2021 Right 28 (12/7) Senior
Philippe Coutinho 24 2022 Right 27 (7/7) Senior
Ben Woodburn 17 2019 Right 7 (1/0) 18 (9/8) Senior
Sheyi Ojo 19 2020 Left 2 (0/0) 12 (3/2) Not Selected
Harry Wilson 20 2019 Left 1 (0/0) 23 (15/10) Senior
Ryan Kent 20 2019 Right 39 (2/1) Not Selected
Jack Dunn 22 2017 Left 23 (6/2) 1 (0/0) Not Selected
Lazar Marković 23 2019 Right 21 (2/0) Senior
Brooks Lennon 19 N/A Right 2 (0/0) 18 (5/2) U20s
Madger Gomes 20 2019 Left 12 (1/1) Not Selected
Yan Dhanda 18 2018 Right 3 (0/1) 21 (7/7) Not Selected
Bobby Adekanye 18 2018 Left 18 (1/5) Not Selected
Okera Simmonds 17 N/A Right 18 (4/3) Not Selected
Marley Blair 17 N/A Right 2 (0/0) Not Selected
Luis Longstaff 16 N/A Left 2 (1/0) U16s
Remainder of 2016-17
  • First choice?
Monitoring
Player Age Preferred Foot Club
Julian Brandt 20 Right Bayer Leverkusen
Demarai Gray 20 Right Leicester City
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain 23 Right Arsenal
Quincy Promes 25 Right Spartak Moscow
Christian Pulisic 18 Right Borussia Dortmund
Ryan Sessegnon 16 Left Fulham
2017-18
  • Signings?
  • Sales?
  • Loans - and to where?
  • First choice?
  • Rotation - when and who?
  • Other Options? Milner, Lallana, Firmino, Origi, Alexander-Arnold...
Former Liverpool Wingers
  • Favourite and why?
  • Favourite individual performance?
Non-Liverpool Wingers
  • Current favourite and why?
  • All-time favourite and why?
  • Favourite individual performance?
submitted by emre23 to LiverpoolFC [link] [comments]


2017.01.03 01:07 johncosta You'll Never Wildly Speculate Alone - January 2017 Edition

It's that time again. Silly Season is back, and so too: You'll Never Wildly Speculate Alone - January 2017 Edition.

Please do leave suggestions and new rumours in the comments as I'll be updating regularly. Reliability is based (roughly) on this graphic.
Speculation (In)
Player Date Position Rumour Reliability Reddit Discussion
BONUS 12/1/2017 NA Reds unlikely to strenthen in January making this whole thread pointless A (Joyce) Here
Tiemoue Bakayoko 12/1/2017 DM Reds want to bring him in this month F- Here
Jesé 9/1/2017 Striker Liverpool are pursuing B- Here
Cian Harries 4/1/2017 CB U23 Trialist could be Red's first January signing A (Echo) Here
Raul Jimenez 3/1/2017 Striker Liverpool consider £50m move D (Goal.com) Here
Emil Forsberg 1/1/2017 Winger Klopp eyes £20m move as Pulisic alternative C (Mirror) Here
Quincy Promes 26/12/2016 Winger Reds eye Promes as they miss out on Draxler C (Mirror) Here, (Bonus from Gini)
Christian Pulisic 3/12/2016 Winger Considered top target despite BVB not wanting to sell A (Reddy) Here and Here
Julian Brandt 21/11/2016 Winger Brandt is a candidate, though Klopp not desperate to buy in January A (Reddy) Here
Mahmoud Dahoud 12/11/2016 Midfielder Liverpool to make January bid C (Football365) Here, Here, and Here
Sardar Azmoun 8/11/2016 Striker Reds target Iranian striker for January A (Barrett) Here
Sead Kolasinac 1/11/2016 Left Back Liverpool hoping to sign Schalke defender on a free C (Bild) Here
Speculation (Out)
Player Date Position Rumour Reliability Reddit Discussion
Brooks Lennon 13/1/2017 Striker Real Salt Lake want him back B Here
Tiago Ilori 5/1/2017 CB Reds agree to £3.75m sale to Reading A (Pearce) Here
Pedro Chirivella 3/1/2017 Midfielder Off to Dutch side "Go Ahead Eagles" for the rest of the season A (Pearce) Here
Kevin Stewart 3/1/2017 Midfielder Reds turn down interest from 5 clubs A (Pearce) Here
Lucas Leiva 26/12/2016 DM/CB Inter Milan interested in loan w/ option to buy A (Pearce) Here and Here
Mamadou Sakho 23/12/2016 CB West Brom and West Ham approach to loan D (Daily Mail) Here
Confirmed Transfers (In)
Player Date Position Rumoured Fee Official Link Reddit Discussion
Sam Hart 11/1/2017 LB Returns from Loan Liverpoolfc.com Here
Confirmed Transfers (Out)
Player Date Position Rumoured Fee Official Link Reddit Discussion
Joe Maguire 13/1/2017 CB? I got nothing Liverpoolfc.com Off to Fleetwood Town
Tiago Ilori 9/1/2017 CB £3.75m Liverpoolfc.com Permanant move to Reading
Pedro Chirivella 6/1/2017 CB Loan Liverpoolfc.com Pedro Chirivella joins Go Ahead Eagles on loan
Not Happening
Player Team Reason Reddit Discussion
Joe Hart Torino (On loan from City) Because Pearce says so Here
Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain Arsenal Denied by Klopp Here
Julian Draxler Wolfsburg Signing for PSG Here
submitted by johncosta to LiverpoolFC [link] [comments]


2015.11.30 21:42 onrv Top Posts for November 2015

Date Theme/s Song Title Artist Year Country Posted by
Sun 1st Track Eleven Everlong Foo Fighters 1997 US That_one_cool_dude
Mon 2nd Saints When the Saints Go Marching In Louis Armstrong 1961 US Glip_Glop
Tue 3rd Fungi, Mushrooms Ground Theme (Super Mario Bros.) Koji Kondo 1985 JP oldwhitelincoln
Wed 4th Waiters and Waitresses The Piano Has Been Drinking (live) Tom Waits 1977 US sbroue
Thu 5th Turn Turn! Turn! Turn! (live) The Byrds 1966 US oldwhitelincoln
Fri 6th Blonde What's Up? 4 Non Blondes 1992 US switchingstations
Sat 7th doot doot, thank mr skeltal (Skull Trumpet) Spooky Scary Skeletons Andrew Gold 1996 US Joshua9182998
Sun 8th Remixes, Edits, Extended Versions (includes 2014) Lovesong (Extended Mix) The Cure 1989 GB oldwhitelincoln
Mon 9th Nordic Countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden) Immigrant Song Led Zeppelin 1970 GB reeforward
Tue 10th Italy Tarzan Boy Baltimora 1985 IT fearsfortears
Wed 11th Africa Biko Peter Gabriel 1980 GB natearchibaldy
Thu 12th Japan Yoshimi Battles the Robots, Pt. 1 The Flaming Lips 2002 US RaccoonLoon
Fri 13th India Brimful of Asha Cornershop 1997 GB bitterbuffaloheart
Sat 14th France Non, je ne regrette rien Edith Piaf 1959 FR Kaphox
Sun 15th Caribbean Islands (Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica etc.) Day-O (The Banana Boat Song) Harry Belafonte 1956 JM/US hifibrown
Mon 16th Less Famous Relatives Too Late for Goodbyes Julian Lennon 1984 GB onrv
Tue 17th Four (4) The Four Seasons Composed by Antonio Vivaldi, performed by Budapest Strings 1723 IT/HU usernamesname
Wed 18th Stars Behind Bars (Musicians Who Have Been to Prison) Folsom Prison Blues (live) Johnny Cash 1968 US reeforward
Thu 19th Acceptance It's All Right (The Way That You Live) The Velvet Underground 1967 US pfannkuchen_ii
Fri 20th Names Not in Title Mambo No. 5 (A Little Bit of...) Lou Bega 1999 DE usernamesname
Sat 21st Holding Hold Me Loosely 38 Special 1981 US switchingstations
Sun 22nd Compilation Finds (Various Artists) Sun God Squirrel Bait 1985 US Grimblewedge
Mon 23rd November The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald Gordon Lightfoot 1976 CA aleagueofmyown
Tue 24th Steve Albini (Start of Producers Week) Heart Shaped Box Nirvana 1993 US That_one_cool_dude
Wed 25th Butch Vig Pretend We're Dead L7 1992 US durianno
Thu 26th Stephen Street Dreams The Cranberries 1994 IE oldwhitelincoln
Fri 27th Phil Spector Do You Remember Rock 'n' Roll Radio? Ramones 1980 US sbroue
Sat 28th Max Martin Since U Been Gone Kelly Clarkson 2004 US That_one_cool_dude
Sun 29th Quincy Jones Rock With You Michael Jackson 1979 US justchuck1070
Mon 30th Rick Rubin BLKKK SKKKN HEAD (Black Skinhead) Kanye West 2013 US darianb1031
submitted by onrv to Musicthemetime [link] [comments]


2015.03.19 22:52 tabledresser [Table] IAmA: I am Brian Wilson, co-founder of The Beach Boys. AMAA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2015-03-19
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
How did you feel about seeing John Cusack and Paul Dano portraying you on film? Is it weird to see aspects of the life that you really lived acted out by others? Well..the movie is on my life and when I saw it it took me back to where I was back in the '60s and '80s. It took me back to when I was young and all different places. It was a thrill to see John and Paul portraying me, they did it very well.
Who was your most memorable fan? When I was in Washington DC about 8 years ago receiving the Kennedy Center Honor, President Bush and I met - I said "Nice to meet you" and he said "I'm one of your fans." I was thrilled.
What advice do you have to offer to new songwriters? And do you have a favorite Bob Dylan song? Blowin' In The Wind i like the lyrics. I met Bob Dylan in an emergency hospital in Malibu..he accidentally had his thumb broken. It was a cool place to meet him. I'm a fan of his for sure.
What is your favorite movie? The Birds by Alfred Hitchcock because it had a sense of humor. Some guys car blew up and he got killed and it made me laugh for some reason running from the birds.
Mr. Wilson, are you a TV game show fan? Which one would you like to a contestant? Wheel of Fortune I love game shows. I watch Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy everyday. I would love to go on but I don't think I'd be very good haha.
Could you describe your most vivid childhood memory? Musical or otherwise? The first time that my brothers and I saw the ocean. My dad brought us there. That was the most memorable part of my childhood.
Have you ever met John Lennon? He's the only Beatle I never met but I admire him, very much so. I've spent time with both of his sons Sean and Julian.
What do you miss most about the 1960's? I miss the spirit of competition and all the cool restaurants and places we used to hang out.
What does it take to keep your voice in such amazing condition after years of singing amazingly? I sing at my piano and I practice every 2 or 3 days singing Beach Boys songs and thats how I keep my voice in good shape.
What did you think the first time you heard the Barenaked Ladies song, "Brian Wilson?" I was honored that they would use my name but it embarrassed me a little bit because I was lying in bed a lot haha.
What is the greatest advice you have been given? Follow through with my songs and don't stop halfway through the song. Write the whole song.
How do you like your steak cooked? What's your favorite flavor of cake? Medium rare with ketchup on top and my favorite flavor of cake is cheesecake.
Since this might be your last tour, will you consider coming to the UK? Well...as I've said before this could be my last tour but of course I will try to get to the UK.
Hi Brian, you're the absolute best. Question: What's one little-known fact about you or your life that you'd like people to know? That I'm deaf in my right ear and that I used to do transcendental meditation at my house. Most people don't know that.
If I were Brian Wilson and you were me, what would you ask? I would ask you What does it feel like to have a number one record on the charts?
How did you come up with the title "do you like worms"? Van dyke came up with that title. I thought it was a strange strange title.
1) When writing some of The Beach Boys songs, specifically Pet Sounds/SMiLE era, did you have a melodic structure to follow or did the songs just come to you sitting on a piano or out of nowhere? 2) Do you have a favourite key to play/sing in? Any favourite chords to play/sing with? The songs came to me sitting at a piano and out of nowhere and came down from my brain and onto the keyboard. My favorite key is B, the song "Darlin'" is in B. No favorite chords, but I like Major chords.
Do you have a favourite concert venue that you like performing in the most? Royal Festival Hall in London because of the crowds and the sound of the room.
What do you consider the best songs on Dennis' solo album? You and I that's my favorite because I liked his vocal. Great vocal.
You had a very well publicized battle with depression for a part of your life. What do you credit with helping you break out of it and getting your drive to make all that great music back? Many thanks for all that music, Brian. My doctor turned me on to exercise, running was what helped break me out of my depression and get me back to songwriting. That among other things.
You are the greatest. What musicians do you admire that have come along in the next generation? Anyone that would surprise people? Al Blaine because of his great drumming. He played on "California Girls."
50 to 100 years from now, what do you want people to take from your legacy of music? The timelessness of "California Girls" and "Surfer Girl," maybe who knows?
Any advice for a young singer? Keep on singing. Keep on singing your songs.
What does it feel like to have a number one record on the charts? It's a great feeling it's a great honor it's an achievement.
Hey Brian, what made you make the decision to get back in touch with Blondie Chaplin? Personally I think it's a great reunion and I can't wait to hear all of "Sail Away" and see you guys on tour! Blondies voice was the only decision we needed he adds so much to the songs he's on. Can't wait to go on tour with him!
What makes you cringe when you hear a bad tune? Any cliche's that bug you? It bugs me when people sing flat.
What song on No Pier Pressure do you enjoy the most? Sail Away because of Blondie's performance.
Hi Brian! What songs or albums would you recommend to someone trying to get into the Beach Boys? Darlin with Carl on lead and California Girls would be the two.
I'm sure you still often get recognized by fans when out in public. How do you feel about fans approaching you? A little bit paranoid to be honest but I'm proud to be recognized.
Love your work Brian! Do you still maintain contact with Paul McCartney? He's always listen "God only knows" among his favourites. I talk to Paul about once a year. We get caught up on music & family.
I bought my first Beach Boys album at a yard sale in the early 70s. I've been a fan since then. Do you remember the first album/record you bought? The first album I bought was Four Freshmen and Five Trombones. It changed my life.
Favourite place to go in London? Picadilly Square.
What's your favourite band? The Beatles.
Any other Smile's sitting in your closet waiting to be released? No, Smile was a one of a kind.
Brian, would you rather fight one horse sized duck or 100 duck sized horses? 100 duck sized horses for sure haha.
Hi Brian, what's been your favorite part about seeing Carnie and Wendy achieve their own success in the business? I'm most proud of their sound. They sing like angels.
What's under Mike Love's baseball cap? A bald head.
Hi Brian, what's your biggest fear? Dying.
If you could give any advice to yourself at age 18, what would it be? Don't take drugs!
Could you tell us the name of your favorite vegatables? Broccolli.
A lot has been written about a rivalry between you and Lennon/McCartney, particularly about their desire to compete against Pet Sounds. I know it's a long time ago, but did you feel the same level of competition with the Beatles? There was mutual admiration, competitiveness not a rivalry. 'Pet Sounds' inspired 'Sgt Pepper.'
Hey Brian! Just want to say thanks for making some of my favorite music. What do you look at as your greatest accomplishment? You've done so much so it would be interesting to know what you're most proud of. Also: Pancakes or waffles? Recording California Girls as well as Good Vibrations. Pancakes for sure.
Last updated: 2015-03-23 21:31 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
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2015.02.08 19:51 Blubbey Post Jan 14/15-15/16 summer transfer window rumour/rubbish collection thread

14/15 winter window thread
I'll update it every now and then. It'll mostly be incoming rumours not outgoings. Mostly rehashing previous rumours I suspect but it's nice to compare! General format:
Player name position team fee (if there) date (dd/mm)
NOTE: These "sources" are going to be unreliable, literally 50 players were "linked" in <6 weeks. These sure as shit aint gospel.
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-line-up-summer-swoop-5123913
Kevin Wimmer CB Cologne 08/02
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-2944157/Tottenham-pole-position-sign-West-Brom-striker-Saido-Berahino-25m.html
Berahino striker WBA £25m 07/02
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/07/tottenham-set-to-finalise-free-transfer-yevhen-konoplyanka-deal-5053740/
Konoplyanka winger (left) Dnipro free (contract ends summer) 07/02
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-boss-mauricio-pochettino-mammana-5139170
Emanuel Mammana River Plate 10/02
http://www.dailystar.co.uk/sport/football/424912/Salomon-Rondon-Tottenham-Liverpool-Transfer-News-Gossip-Stars-Update-Zenit-Latest
Salomon Rondon striker Zenit Saint Petersburg £16m 10/02
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/558159/Tottenham-double-Man-Utd-offer-Memphis-Depay-boss-Pochettino-star-Holland
Depay winger PSV £20m 14/02
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/558271/Tottenham-West-Ham-Transfer-Battle-Everton-Striker-Romelu-Lukaku
Lukaku striker Everton ~£30m 15/02
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/557575/Manchester-City-Yacine-Brahimi-transfer-news
Brahimi attacking mid/winger Porto ~£30m 11/02
http://www.goal.com/id-ID/news/784/transfer-pemain/2015/02/17/8994072/tottenham-hotspur-turut-minati-kevin-de-bruyne
KdB #10 Wolfsburg (source later)
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/15/roberto-soldado-finally-looks-set-to-leave-tottenham-hotspur-this-summer-5063761/
Luciano Vietto striker Villareal (source later)
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/17/tottenham-transfer-talks-to-sign-godfred-donsah-ahead-of-arsenal-5066242/
Godfred Donsah midfielder Cagliari Calcio
https://www.clubcall.com/southampton/portugal-match-for-saints-scout-1759193.html
Nicolás Gaitán midfielder Benfica
http://www.dailystar.co.uk/sport/football/425850/Fernando-Llorente-Tottenham-Arsenal-Chelsea-Transfer-News-Gossip-Update-Stars-Latest
Llorente striker Juventus £16m 16/02
Kerem Demirbay midfielder Hamburger SV
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/18/tottenham-hotspur-planning-10m-transfer-offer-for-valencias-shkodran-mustafi-5068477/
Shkodran Mustafi CB Valencia £10m 17/02
http://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-transfer-news-pochettino-plots-summer-move-for-25m-benfica-winger-eduardo-salvio-10050571.html
Salvio winger Benfica ~£25m 17/02
http://talksport.com/football/blow-arsenal-and-tottenham-boost-man-city-striker-hints-etihad-move-150212136164
Dybala striker Palermo ~£30m 12/02
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/15/roberto-soldado-finally-looks-set-to-leave-tottenham-hotspur-this-summer-5063761/
Jackson Martinez striker Porto 15/02
http://www.le10sport.com/football/mercato/mercato-om-ces-dernieres-precisions-sur-le-dossier-ayew-180548
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/16/marseille-star-andre-ayew-puts-premier-league-clubs-on-alert-after-admitting-he-could-leave-club-this-summer-5065487/
Ayew winger Marseille free (contract ends summer) 16/02
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/18/arsenal-ready-to-sign-14-8m-maxime-gonalons-after-arsene-wenger-requests-transfer-5067793/
Maxime Gonalons midfielder Lyon ~£15m 18/02
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-consider-benficas-20million-rated-eduardo-5179194
J. Rodriguez attacker (wing/striker) Southampton ~£12m 17/02
http://talksport.com/football/atletico-madrid-enter-race-turkish-winger-also-targeted-tottenham-150217136673
Gokhan Tore winger besiktas ~£12m 17/02
http://www.voetbalnieuws.be/news/167641/Engelse_club_zag_plan_met_Moses_Simon_in_duigen_vallen
Moses Gent winger Gent 15/02
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/sport/football/clubs/tottenhamhotspuarticle4360142.ece
Alderweireld CB Atl Mad 20/12
http://forzaitalianfootball.com/2015/02/tottenham-everton-and-west-ham-united-linked-with-move-for-cesena-forward/
Defrel striker Cesena 21/02
http://www.goal.com/en-gb/news/2892/transfer-zone/2015/02/22/9158872/the-insider-tottenham-rival-manchester-united-for-clyne
Clyne RB Southampton 22/02
http://www.turkish-football.com/chelsea-tottenham-keeping-tabs-on-galatasaray-target-niasse/
Niasse striker Lokomotiv Moscow 22/02
http://www.squawka.com/news/tottenham-will-have-to-pay-10-million-in-order-to-sign-ignacio-camacho-from-malaga/310033
Camacho holding midfielder Malaga ~£15m 22/02
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-eye-transfer-sporting-lisbons-5211126
Bubacar Djalo "new Pogba" Sporting 22/02 (cheap)
http://www.record.xl.pt/Futebol/Nacional/1a_liga/Sporting/interior.aspx?content_id=932875
Slimani striker Sporting 20m euro 24/02
http://metro.co.uk/2015/02/25/monacos-aymen-abdennour-confirms-interest-from-tottenham-over-summer-transfer-5078577/
Abdennour CB Monaco n/a 25/02
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-take-carlos-bacca-transfer-5249024
Bacca striker Sevilla £18m 28/02
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/560873/Liverpool-Tottenham-blow-Alexandre-Lacazette-pursuit
Lacazette striker Lyon n/a 27/02
http://talksport.com/football/arsenal-and-man-city-transfer-target-umtitis-incredible-goal-against-spurs-150305138647
Umtiti CB Lyon n/a 05/03
http://metro.co.uk/2015/03/06/southampton-ready-to-offer-arsenal-and-tottenham-transfer-target-morgan-schneiderlin-bumper-new-contract-5091009/
Schneiderlin CM southampton ~£25m 05/03
http://talksport.com/football/arsenal-and-tottenham-set-transfer-tussle-over-dutch-starlet-150306138819
Boetius winger feyenoord 06/03
http://www.itv.com/news/2015-03-07/top-rumours-spurs-agree-deal-to-sign-leicester-winge
Mahrez winger leicester £7m 07/03
http://www.dailystar.co.uk/sport/football/429582/Javier-Hernandez-Man-Utd-Everton-Real-Madrid-Transfer-West-Ham-Stars-Gossip-Latest
chicarito striker man u £8m 08/03
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/563006/Tottenham-Adrien-Rabiot-PSG-offiical-visit-transfer-news
Rabiot CM PSG 10/03
http://talksport.com/football/reports-atletico-madrid-lead-race-tottenham-and-manchester-city-target-150310139206
Anderson CM Lazio £20m+ 10/03
http://metro.co.uk/2015/03/10/tottenham-begin-transfer-talks-to-sign-psg-forward-ezequiel-lavezzi-5096141/
Lavezzi winger PSG 10/03
http://www.superdeporte.es/levante/2015/03/09/tottenham-espia-victor-camarasa/250863.html
Camarasa CM Levante 12m euro buyout clause 09/03
http://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-transfer-news-spurs-monitor-cologne-goalkeeper-timo-horn-as-they-make-plans-for-life-after-hugo-lloris-10081700.html
Horn keeper cologne 03/03
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/tottenham-hotspur-target-celta-de-vigo-midfielder-michael-krohn-dehli-summer-signing-1491356
Dehli winger celta vigo free 10/03
http://www.calciomercato.com/news/juve-attenta-londra-chiama-zaza-380664
Zaza striker sassulo ~15m e 11/03
http://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-and-liverpool-target-charlie-austin-could-leave-qpr-admits-les-ferdinand-10099962.html
Austin striker qpr 11/03
http://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-transfer-news-spurs-eye-summer-swoop-for-portugalbased-trio-10100341.html
Silva winger braga £17.7m release 11/03
http://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-transfer-news-spurs-eye-summer-swoop-for-portugalbased-trio-10100341.html
Talisca forward benfica 11/03
http://www.ojogo.pt/Futebol/1a_liga/Sporting/interior.aspx?content_id=4443552
mane winger sporting 11/03
http://talksport.com/football/roma-line-ps10million-offer-tottenham-and-liverpool-target-150311139389
handanovic keeper inter ~£10m 11/03
http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/ma16/transfer-rumours-radamel-falcao-chelsea
Falcao striker monaco 16/03
http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/ma16/transfer-rumours-radamel-falcao-chelsea
ings striker burnley 16/03
http://metro.co.uk/2015/03/21/tottenham-hotspur-send-scouts-to-watch-heerenveen-hot-shot-mark-uth-5114705/
Mark Uth striker Heerenveen 21/03
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-keeping-tabs-3million-rated-rosario-5379106
Cervi striker Rosario Central £3m 21/03
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/565812/Man-Utd-Arsenal-Chelsea-Liverpool-Spurs-Gareth-Bale
Bale winger RM 23/03
http://metro.co.uk/2015/03/24/tottenham-to-sign-valencia-stars-sofiane-feghouli-and-shkodran-mustafi-in-double-transfer-deal-5117593/
Feghouli winger Valencia £7m 24/03
http://www.london24.com/sport/football/clubs/west-ham/west_ham_set_to_beat_arsenal_and_spurs_to_5million_defender_deal_1_4006354
Schar CB Basel £5m 24/03
http://www.squawka.com/news/malaga-winger-samuel-garcia-subject-of-liverpool-interest/340395
Garcia winger malaga £8m 27/03
http://forzaitalianfootball.com/2015/03/tottenham-hotspur-shopping-in-serie-a/
Glik CB Torino 31/03
http://metro.co.uk/2015/04/01/liverpool-plot-summer-transfer-move-for-former-chelsea-youngster-jacopo-sala-5130573/
Sala RB Verona 1/04
http://www.sport-english.com/en/noticias/inglaterra/barcelonas-ibrahim-afellay-tottenham-transfer-target-this-summer-4071047
Afellay Winger Barca free 02/04
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-join-race-chelsea-goalkeeper-5449390
Cech GK Chelsea £10m 02/04
http://www.novosti.rs/vesti/sport.294.html:541549-Sport-Ajaks-i-Totenhem-love-Jovica
Jovic strikewinger Red Star Belgrade 02/04
http://www.tuttosport.com/calcio/calciomercato/2015/04/04-327048/La+Premier+torna+a+mettere+nel+mirino+Ogbonna
Ogbonna CB Juve 04/04
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/teams/fulham/11519424/Revealed-The-player-the-Premier-Leagues-big-six-all-want-to-buy-this-summer.html
Roberts second strikewinger Fulham 07/04
http://metro.co.uk/2015/04/07/tottenham-making-transfer-bid-for-manchester-uniteds-juan-mata-5137863/
Mata 10 Man U £18.3m 07/04
http://metro.co.uk/2015/04/09/tottenham-hotspur-linked-with-a-move-for-schalkes-benedikt-howedes-they-could-easily-afford-any-transfer-fee-5141495/
Howedes CB/RB/LB Schalke £13m 09/04
http://www.tuttomercatoweb.com/serie-a/juventus-hector-moreno-e-il-nome-nuovo-per-la-mediana-666430
Moreno CB Espanyol 08/04
http://www.squawka.com/news/reports-tottenham-may-lose-out-to-west-brom-for-andre-pierre-gignac/350296
gignac striker marseille free 09/04
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/569475/Juventus-rival-Tottenham-Munich-youngster-Julian-Weigl
Weigl CM 1860 munich £2.3m 09/04
https://twitter.com/SkySportsNewsHQ/status/588276292308574208?s=09
Cleverley CM Man U free 15/04
http://www.theguardian.com/football/2015/ap17/football-transfer-rumour-mill-miroslav-klose-tottenham-hotspur
Klose striker lazio free 17/04
http://www.lesechos.fsport/football/sports-715419-tottenham-na-pas-oublie-florian-thauvin-1111958.php
Thauvin winger Marseille 16/04
http://metro.co.uk/2015/04/14/tottenham-line-up-transfer-of-sporting-lisbon-star-miguel-lopes-5148023/
Lopes RB sporting 14/04
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-rival-liverpool-yannick-bolasie-5582060
Bolasie winger Palace 25/04
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/teams/tottenham-hotspu11553885/Everton-winger-Kevin-Mirallas-and-Tottenhams-Aaron-Lennon-poised-to-swap-clubs-during-transfer-window.html
mirallas winger everton 21/04 (thought I added this months ago)
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/456202/Tottenham-Julian-Cuesta-Replacement-Hugo-Lloris
Cuesta GK Almeria 02/05
http://www.voetbalnieuws.be/news/179447/Ook_Tottenham_meldt_zich_voor_talent_Club_Brugge
Oulare striker Brugge 04/05
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-3067417/Chelsea-winger-Mohamed-Salah-make-switch-London-Premier-League-rivals-Tottenham-summer.html
Salah winger Chelsea £18m 04/05
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/574766/Son-Heung-Min-Liverpool-transfer-news
Son Heung-Min winger bayer lev ~£15m 04/05
http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/football/transfer-news/tottenham-lead-list-ten-premier-5636297
Wilson striker bournemouth ~£12m 04/05
http://www.express.co.uk/sport/football/576133/Tottenham-Want-Celtic-Defender-Virgil-van-Dijk
van dijk CB Celtic ~£10m 09/05
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-3075031/Claudio-Beauvue-eyed-Hull-Tottenham-6m-rated-striker-says-wants-leave-Guingamp.html
Beauvue striker guingamp £6m 09/05
http://www.tuttosport.com/calcio/calciomercato/2015/05/13-331035/Sampdoria%3A+Donadoni+e+Sarri+sondati+per+il+dopo+Mihajlovic?print
Obiang midfielder sampdoria 13/05
http://metro.co.uk/2015/04/21/arsenals-3million-demarai-gray-transfer-under-threat-as-liverpool-prepare-bid-for-birmingham-city-star-5160068/
Gray winger birmingham ~£5m 21/04
http://www.insidefutbol.com/2015/05/14/roma-prepare-bid-for-tottenham-hotspur-target-yohan-cabaye/207792/
Cabaye midfielder PSG 14/05
http://www.tuttomercatoweb.com/serie-a/esclusiva-tmw-milan-il-tottenham-cerca-il-sorpasso-per-soldo-680021
Soldo defender dynamo zagreb 14/05
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-3079982/Roma-hope-beat-Liverpool-Chelsea-Manchester-United-signing-30million-Aston-Villa-striker-Christian-Benteke.html
Martial forward monaco 13/05
http://metro.co.uk/2015/05/17/tottenham-looking-to-hijack-newcastle-bid-for-barcelona-wonderkid-sandro-ramirez-5201998/
Ramirez forward Barca 17/05
http://www.nuevofutbol.com/2015/05/el-tottenham-tantea-sergi-darder.html
Darder CM Malaga 19/05
http://www.goal.com/nl/news/786/transfers/2015/05/20/11911472/manchester-united-in-de-race-om-bilal-ould-chikh
Bilal Ould-Chikh winger twente 20/05
http://www.squawka.com/news/reports-tottenham-to-revive-interest-in-barcelonas-marc-bartra/380396
Bartra cb barca ~£7m/10m euro 20/05
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/teams/barcelona/11618740/Liverpool-Chelsea-Arsenal-and-Tottenham-alerted-to-news-Barcelonas-Pedro-is-available-for-7m.html
Pedro winger Barca ~£7m 20/05
http://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-transfer-news--andriy-yarmolenko-domagoj-vida-and-stefan-savic-on-spurs-summer-wishlist-10200599.html
Yarmolenko striker dynamo Kyiv 24/04
submitted by Blubbey to coys [link] [comments]


2015.02.01 02:34 onrv Top Posts of January 2015

Date Theme/s Song Title Artist Year Country Posted by
Thu 1st Seen Live in 2014 Mouthful of Diamonds Phantogram 2009 US HipGuy
Fri 2nd Gangsters, Mobsters, Wise Guys Damn It Feels Good to be a Gangsta Geto Boys 1992 US mackavicious
Sat 3rd Jumping Jump Van Halen 1983 US fivehourdelay
Sun 4th Hope for the Future O-o-h Child Five Soulsteps 1970 US topcutter
Mon 5th Loneliness Owner of a Lonely Heart Yes 1983 GB aerial1981
Tue 6th Ethics, Morality Walk on the Wild Side Lou Reed 1972 US g_sneezus
Wed 7th Broke (also includes 2013) I Need a Dollar Aloe Blacc 2010 US justchuck1070
Thu 8th Letters, Mail, Post, Stamps Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours Stevie Wonder 1970 US oldwhitelincoln
Fri 9th Elvis Presley, David Bowie Bowie Flight of the Conchords 2007 NZ itsmebiscuits
Sat 10th Cold Cold as Ice Foreigner 1977 GB/US justchuck1070
Sun 11th One, Eleven One Metallica 1988 US onrv
Mon 12th Late (also includes 2014) Too Late for Goodbyes Julian Lennon 1984 US SummerMummer
Tue 13th Harmonies Roundabout Yes 1971 GB KnowsPick
Wed 14th Spies Theme from Mission: Impossible Adam Clayton & Larry Mullen 1996 IE aerial1981
Thu 15th Asian Ue o Muite Aruko (Sukiyaki) Kyu Sakamato 1961 JP SummerMummer
Fri 16th Ousiders Creep Radiohead 1994 GB oldwhitelincoln
Sat 17th Hipster Cred (Liked Before They Were Cool) The Distance Cake 1996 US oldwhitelincoln
Sun 18th Gggg Nuthin' But a 'G' Thang Dr. Dre feat. Snoop Doggy Dogg 1992 US sbroue
Mon 19th States of Matter (Solid, Liquid, Gas, Plasma) I Melt with You The English Beat 1982 GB topcutter
Tue 20th Boy Bands and Teen Idols Be-Bop Baby Ricky Nelson 1957 US That_one_cool_dude
Wed 21st Soft Rock Another Day in Paradise Phil Collins 1989 GB onrv
Thu 22nd Driving Highway Star Deep Purple 1972 GB killerbunnyfamily
Fri 23rd Buying and Selling The Man Who Sold the World (live) Nirvana 1994 US ___DEADPOOL______
Sat 24th Help With a Little Help From My Friends Th Beatles 1967 GB onrv
Sun 25th Footwear, Shoes Goody Two Shoes Adam Ant 1982 GB justchuck1070
Mon 26th Textiles Undone - The Sweater Song Weezer 1994 US rwbrwb55
Tue 27th Tomorrow All Tomorrow's Parties The Velvet Underground 1966 US justchuck1070
Wed 28th Space (also includes 2014) Space Oddity David Bowie 1969 GB oldwhitelincoln
Thu 29th Hills, Mountains Over the Hills and Far Away Led Zeppelin 1973 GB justchuck1070
Fri 30th Name-Calling That's Not My Name The Ting Tings 2008 GB fatalfuryguy
Sat 31st Sky Mr. Blue Sky Electric Light Orchestra 1977 GB SummerMummer
First month of the year done and dusted! justchuck1070 managed to nab the gold this month with 5 top posts, and the overall most upvoted post of the month was Nirvana. Eight songs from the 70s, three songs from 1994 and two songs from Yes. Countries represented include United States of America (16), United Kingdom (13, much more than usual), Ireland, Japan and New Zealand. Check out the wiki if you want to relive more past themes. Cheers cobber.
submitted by onrv to Musicthemetime [link] [comments]


2013.10.21 12:44 gocubsgo22 I believe the height of music was the 1960's-1980's, and most music made since then is terrible. CMV

I feel most music since I have been alive (1993) just has not been on par with anything made before. It seems like starting around 1990 there was a sizable dip in originality of music, and songs were churned out of over-hyped, over-sexualized artists. These songs lack originality in many ways that I have noticed:
Ear-pleasing guitar riffs have morphed into electronic beats
Part of this drop in the quality of music comes from this. In today's music, instead of having a writer who understands music theory, one just needs a computer, a program or two, and a singer who appeals to the broadest demographic. There is no talent involved in creating music anymore. To further on the topic of writing...
Writing quality has diminished
What happened to writing a song about something that has happened to you, or made an impact on you or someone important to you? One of my favorite songs, "Hey Jude" by The Beatles, was written by Paul McCartney to comfort John Lennon's five year old son, Julian. Today, music is all about sex, drugs, money, cars, etc. And it's not to say it wasn't in what I like to call "The Golden Era" (dates in title) as well, but it sure feels to me those had more substance and meaning.
I'm going to take an artist as an example here and use Taylor Swift. I don't know what your opinion is of her, but like most I encounter, it seems to be either you like her or you don't. What can't be argued is the fact that she wrote or co-wrote every song she has released. Not to add that she can play an instrument (guitar). I'm looking at you, Katy Perry. However, it seems to me the side of not liking Swift is ever-growing, even as her songs and writing continue to grow and evolve. (Yes, I'm a fan.) I don't understand how someone such as her can be chided for her music when many of today's star simply get fed complete songs and only go out and sing (assuming they don't lip sync).
I would further like to add I do listen to the same type of music I'm complaining about sometimes; I'll admit, some songs are pretty catchy. I would take 100/100 times listening to "Freebird" by Lynyrd Skynyrd and know someone actually wrote that than listen to Miley Cyrus, though.
One last thing that I'll leave right here as a semi-important footnote: top 500 songs of all time by Rolling Stone
the highest from 1990 on is number nine
Edit: formatting, spelling, grammar, etc
submitted by gocubsgo22 to changemyview [link] [comments]


Julian Lennon Answers 22 Questions About Himself - YouTube Julian Lennon : Live in Germany 1989. - YouTube Julian Lennon slams Yoko Ono and talks of John Lennon and ... Cynthia Lennon talks about Yoko's treatment of Julian ... Julian Lennon - 'Hallmark' 30th April 2019 - YouTube Julian Lennon 'NBC' - 30th April 2019 - YouTube Julian Lennon - Too Late for Goodbyes - YouTube Julian Lennon remembers his father, the Beatles - YouTube Julian Lennon Gets Candid About His Late Father, The ...

John Lennon's son Julian left 'shaking inside' after ...

  1. Julian Lennon Answers 22 Questions About Himself - YouTube
  2. Julian Lennon : Live in Germany 1989. - YouTube
  3. Julian Lennon slams Yoko Ono and talks of John Lennon and ...
  4. Cynthia Lennon talks about Yoko's treatment of Julian ...
  5. Julian Lennon - 'Hallmark' 30th April 2019 - YouTube
  6. Julian Lennon 'NBC' - 30th April 2019 - YouTube
  7. Julian Lennon - Too Late for Goodbyes - YouTube
  8. Julian Lennon remembers his father, the Beatles - YouTube
  9. Julian Lennon Gets Candid About His Late Father, The ...

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. Watch Julian Lennon try to answer 22 questions as quickly as possible during his online book signing for 'Love The Earth'. [Re-Release 2013] Grammy nominated musician Julian Lennon discusses “Everything Changes,” his first album in 15 years, and gets candid about his late father,... This is an interview with Julian Lennon from March 18th 1999 with Dini Petty. He speaks of his new album, his TRUE feelings of Yoko Ono, Sean Lennon, Paul Mc... Julian Lennon - Too Late for Goodbyes Ever since you've been leaving me, I've been wanting to cry. Now I know how it feels for you, I've been wanting to die.... As we celebrate the 50th anniversary or the Beatles' arrival in America, Julian Lennon tells CBS News what it was like growing up as the son of a Beatle. What a lovely lovely lady. Dignified, polite and the polar opposite of the disgraceful Yoko OrNearestOffer. RIP Ma'am. X. John #Lennon. #Cynthia Lennon. Juli... Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. ....at the ''St. Wendel Open Air Music Festival''. There were two broadcasts of this, and one of them didn't include the encore which features Johnny B. Good...